General Category > All Grain Brewing

acid malt and lactic acid?

(1/3) > >>

dean:
Is acid malt the same as acidulated malt?  I was looking at a description of acidulated malt and it sounds like its soaked in lactic acid? 

Kaiser:
Yes, they are the same. Acid and acidulated malt are produced by spraying them with lactic acid and drying it. The acid content is about 3% by weight.

Kai

denny:
Never used acid malt, but I use lactic acid on my lighter beers.  It would seem to me that lactic acid additions would be easier to control than using acid malt, where you have to decide on an amount before you actually know what your pH is.  I guess that assumes you're using the acid malt for pH adjustment and not taste.  So, those of you who have used acid malt, how do you go about deciding how much to use?  And if acid malt is malt sprayed with lactic acid, what advantage does it have over adding lactic acid directly?

Kaiser:

--- Quote from: denny on January 27, 2010, 09:16:30 AM ---Never used acid malt, but I use lactic acid on my lighter beers.  It would seem to me that lactic acid additions would be easier to control than using acid malt, where you have to decide on an amount before you actually know what your pH is.  I guess that assumes you're using the acid malt for pH adjustment and not taste.  So, those of you who have used acid malt, how do you go about deciding how much to use?  And if acid malt is malt sprayed with lactic acid, what advantage does it have over adding lactic acid directly?

--- End quote ---

You can determine the necessary amount of acid malt by using a water spreadsheet. If you know your current residual alkalinity you can determine how much acid you need to lower it to your target RA. That amount of acid can be calculated as 88% LA or acid malt. I have also used acid malt ad-hoc after testing mash pH but these days I prefer figuring out the necessary amounts ahead of time so I don’t have to take care of it while brewing.

Here are some numbers:

Each kg of acid malt can neutralize ~17-18 g of alkalinity as CaCO3. I.e. to lower a residual alkalinity of 100 ppm to -100 ppm in 16 l water you need to neutralize 200 mg/l * 16 l = 3.2 g as CaCO3 which takes ~ 0.18 kg of acid malt.

I like the “elegance” of using acid malt though I also have 88% LA at home. If you use strong lactic acid you need to be able to measure very small amounts 1-2 ml at a time while acid malt can simple be weighed with a scale you already have.

Kai

denny:
Thanks for the explanation, Kai.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version