General Category > Equipment and Software

Questions you may have about March Pumps? post them here

<< < (11/15) > >>

mabrungard:

--- Quote from: kgs on June 03, 2012, 09:10:18 AM ---
Second q: Assuming I get the 815-PL, I assume I go with polysulfone QDs/couplers (versus other plastic)?  I'm considering a March pump to move water from the HLT to the mash tun, from the mash tun to the brew kettle, and from the brew kettle into the fermenter with a plate chiller inline, with an option to prechill the water with an IC I'm not using and a submersible pump.  I'm trying to go as "lift-less" as possible. Given my current brew setup in an apartment (moving things among kitchen, deck, and lower level), I am thinking of mounting this pump to something totable or installing in a toolbox, and there will be a lot of connecting/disconnecting during the brewing process, some at high temp.

3. In terms of a basic pump startup list, does this seem right?

Pump
Something to mount pump on (or in) + hardware
1/2in SS ball valve to manage flow from output
1/2in quick disconnects (4, two male, two female)
Thermoplastic tubing
Hose clamps (to ball valve barbs on BK and cooler)
Inline GFCI


--- End quote ---

I've seen pumps mounted in tool boxes, its feasible.  I've also see someone selling a mounting plate that is bolted between the motor and the pump housing.  That allows the unit to be bolted to a base.  In the case of a tool box, you could mount the pump in the same way as with that mounting plate in that you could put the motor inside the box and sandwich the tool box side between the motor and pump housing. 

I don't really like the QD units since there are vanes inside those couplers that can clog.  I like the stainless steel camlocks with silicone gasket.  I have the camlocks with barb fittings.  The only bad thing with those things is the ID through the barb ends is kind of small.  I've found that it doesn't really matter though, the flow rate is only slightly affected.  I calculated a couple of feet of head loss due to the barb ID, so its not really a big deal.

Brewing is not worth dying for, so the GFCI is an important consideration.  Its good you're including one.  Including valves on both sides of the pump is good so that you can keep fluid in the pump.  Of course, you only throttle the pump on the output side. 

Although the center inlet configuration pump is more efficient, I like having the inlet and outlet pipes in line so that those pipes can be more easily supported.  I have my pump mounted in a frame with plywood plates at each end with precisely drilled holes that support those pipes and valves and prevent the breaking of that fragile plastic pump housing.  I've had my pump for almost a decade now, without breaking the housing.  I suppose that mounting the entire pump within a tool box would make it possible to pass the pipes through the sides of the box to support the pipes.  I guess if you had one of those pump mounts, you could bolt it to the box bottom and pass the pipes through the walls. 

Enjoy!

kgs:

--- Quote from: mabrungard on June 03, 2012, 12:12:06 PM ---
--- Quote from: kgs on June 03, 2012, 09:10:18 AM ---
Second q: Assuming I get the 815-PL, I assume I go with polysulfone QDs/couplers (versus other plastic)?  I'm considering a March pump to move water from the HLT to the mash tun, from the mash tun to the brew kettle, and from the brew kettle into the fermenter with a plate chiller inline, with an option to prechill the water with an IC I'm not using and a submersible pump.  I'm trying to go as "lift-less" as possible. Given my current brew setup in an apartment (moving things among kitchen, deck, and lower level), I am thinking of mounting this pump to something totable or installing in a toolbox, and there will be a lot of connecting/disconnecting during the brewing process, some at high temp.

3. In terms of a basic pump startup list, does this seem right?

Pump
Something to mount pump on (or in) + hardware
1/2in SS ball valve to manage flow from output
1/2in quick disconnects (4, two male, two female)
Thermoplastic tubing
Hose clamps (to ball valve barbs on BK and cooler)
Inline GFCI


--- End quote ---


I don't really like the QD units since there are vanes inside those couplers that can clog.  I like the stainless steel camlocks with silicone gasket.

... 

... I suppose that mounting the entire pump within a tool box would make it possible to pass the pipes through the sides of the box to support the pipes.  I guess if you had one of those pump mounts, you could bolt it to the box bottom and pass the pipes through the walls. 

Enjoy!

--- End quote ---

Thanks -- lots of good info here. The pump-in-a-toolbox projects I've seen are similar to this (based on a 2009 BYO article):

http://snakeriverbrewers.org/index.php?topic=3972.0

I like this one because he wired the GFCI into the toolbox in a way that it could be used independently of the pump. What my dad the electrician would probably suggest if he were still on this planet is that the power switchplate should be labeled to differentiate main power from the pump, to prevent accidentally switching on the pump while dry.

Edit: just to be clear, you're using stainless steel camlocks with plastic threads? No wear issues?

kgs:
Update: as I close out my homebrewing upgrade projects for a while (work kicks up in two weeks and doesn't stop until next summer), I'm glad I didn't get the toolbox before the pump arrived. It's just heavy enough that I see I don't want to do that. The pump on a small footstool idea might work (and is a project I might even be able to sneak in). For right now I just put the pump ON a small footstool. But it's great to have a pump!

dean_palmer:
There was a previous question about using the March 815 size impellers in the 809HS pumps, and I just did that change this past week. It did make a difference in the speed and ease pf priming and my pumps are already in the optimum position. They both now prime quickly and pump at an increased volume (not that a volume increase was the need).

What I also found is that when I added a new pump head recently (stainless) that the head I removed already had the high flow impeller installed. I thought it was just a coincidence that when I installed the new head and repositioned my pumps on the rack that it seemed like they were harder to prime than before. It was the impeller, and the reason that I'd use this one pump more than the other regularly is that it always seemed to prime easier. Now I know why :-)

beersabound:
I am considering buying an 809 and am wondering if I should use it on the hot or cold side and why. 

Cheers, Tim

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version