Author Topic: when to plants hops?  (Read 2339 times)

Offline csu007

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Re: when to plants hops?
« Reply #15 on: March 19, 2012, 12:58:43 AM »

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It will work a lot better if you tie some twine to the top of the stump for the hops.  The stump is probably too big around for the hops to want to climb around behind it, but i haven't tried it.
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that's a good idea makes total sense. thanks
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Offline Slowbrew

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Re: when to plants hops?
« Reply #16 on: March 19, 2012, 05:49:18 AM »
If you don't own the house you should probably bury a container by the stump.  That will keep them from spreading all over the yard and keep the roots cooler as well as help limit how often you need to water them.

When/If you move, dig up the contatiner and backfill the hole.

Paul
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Offline Delo

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Re: when to plants hops?
« Reply #17 on: March 19, 2012, 07:12:16 AM »
It will work a lot better if you tie some twine to the top of the stump for the hops.  The stump is probably too big around for the hops to want to climb around behind it, but i haven't tried it.

I agree with this. My hop bines that don't find the twine tend to meander until they find something they can wrap around.  For me, keeping the bines in one place makes it easier at harvest time.

If you don't own the house you should probably bury a container by the stump.  That will keep them from spreading all over the yard and keep the roots cooler as well as help limit how often you need to water them.

When/If you move, dig up the container and backfill the hole.

Paul

Also agree. I tried to move my willamette hop plant away from my cascades after the first year of being planted in the ground and the root system was so big that I wound up just leaving it there. Its amazing how much can grow in just a years time.  If using a container, choose as large as possible. Smaller containers can prohibit growth and hop production. 

Good Luck!
Mark