Author Topic: Three Tier Stand - Design Considerations  (Read 4130 times)

Offline johnny_b

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Three Tier Stand - Design Considerations
« on: January 12, 2010, 05:51:20 AM »
Hello all,

I am ready to tackle the build of a 3 tier brew stand, I have the capability of welding in my garage and intend on using 1" box tubing to build the structure. I am wondering if there are any issues that have been seen with certain design details that should be avoided or added. I will be using converted kegs for the HLT and kettle and an Igloo Ice Cube for my MLT. I envision about a two foot rise for every step, starting with the bottom of brew kettle at about 2 feet from the floor. I do plan on incorporating some small step platforms on the stand.

The kind of things that come to mind as potential issues are:

  • Heat shield for MLT
  • Not a large enough height difference
  • Being able to level the whole stand

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Steve
Pimpin' ain't easy.

Primary: Black Spot APA
Secondary: Fall Cyser
Drinking: Rye IPA, ESB

Offline yugamrap

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Re: Three Tier Stand - Design Considerations
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2010, 12:36:38 PM »
If you're set on a three-tier system, go for it.  However, have you considered a two-tier system with a pump?  That would let you keep the overall height lower.  You'd be able to fly sparge if you want, and you can use the pump for a variety of other uses - like recirculating while chilling, or pumping to your fermenter.  I'd suggest that you try building a a mock-up of your system to try the height dimensions you're thinking of.  You could do that with a ladder, table, saw horses, or whatever is handy.  I did a brew session with a mock-up of the system I'd been thinking about to see how it worked out.  It was very helpful to actually brew on the mock-up because I found some things I'd like to change, add, and delete from my design.

I've been working out the details for converting a salvaged factory cart to a brew cart, and I've settled on a single-level system.  I batch sparge, so I'll only need one pump -  which I recently got as a holiday gift.  The cart will have two burners on one level, and a folding shelf on the end to hold a mash tun.  I might even try to design the shelf so I can tip the mash tun for emptying.  I settled on a single-level system because I won't need to lift very much, or have hot water up high.  I also want to be able to look into the top of any of the brewing vessels without using a ladder, stool, or mirror.



 
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Online kramerog

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Re: Three Tier Stand - Design Considerations
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2010, 09:52:32 PM »
In my 3 tier stand I have not found it necessary to put up a heat shield but I did wrap some aluminum foil around a wire that  passed near one of the burners for a margin of safety.  I purchased some "roof tin" made of steel for the shield but did not use..

I built my 3 tier system for doing 10-gal batches tall and narrow rather than wide and short in my basement, see http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=30780367&l=fc4ca620da&id=1455129973.  I am having an issue with a very yellow flame for my bottom jet burner due to what I think is too little clearance from the floor.  If you are using a burner assembly that mixes the fuel with air before going into the burner then floor clearance should never be an issue.

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Offline rep

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Re: Three Tier Stand - Design Considerations
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2010, 03:25:16 PM »
I started out with a three tier stand and made some pretty good beer with it.

As I progressed in the hobby, safety became a higher priority.

I wanted to move to ten gallon batches.  In addition, I found myself brewing alone during the week when nobody was home including neighbors.  I found dismantling the HLT, even when almost empty was getting to be a drain on me.  I also began to question if I wanted 7-8 gallons of water a 190F above my head.

I went to a single tier and love it.  Although my next build will be electric and I may opt for a two tier at that time.

I do think you are asking the right question.  careful consideration is always a good idea.

Good luck
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Offline johnny_b

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Re: Three Tier Stand - Design Considerations
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2010, 07:32:41 AM »
Thank you for the feedback. I think that mocking up the proposed setup is a really good idea before finalizing the stand design.

kramerog - Why did you reduce the number of jets on those burners? I picked up two of those exact burners.

rep - Totally understand the safety issue, I think I will include a "rail" around the HLT to prevent tipping.

I am sure that some day I will go to a single or two tier system. The nice thing about steel is that it can be cut and welded and anything that I build now can be modified at some point down the line.
Pimpin' ain't easy.

Primary: Black Spot APA
Secondary: Fall Cyser
Drinking: Rye IPA, ESB

Online kramerog

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Re: Three Tier Stand - Design Considerations
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2010, 04:18:58 PM »
Quote
kramerog - Why did you reduce the number of jets on those burners? I picked up two of those exact burners.

Those burners have a limited adjustment range.  Unlike a kitchen stove, the burners burn very yellow at low fuel flows.  The burners have more than enough BTUs to cause constant boilovers of 10 gal batches from my thin wall brewing kettle.  I forget the type of screws I used to replace the burner tips but I should be able to find the info at home.  You might find the burners to be not so oversized if you are using a keggle, which is very inefficient  to heat due to its relatively narrow bottom, thick walls, etc.

The screws I bought from McMaster Carr are M8 20 mm.  Shorter ones would work fine.  Use pipe thread compound for gas to seal.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2010, 06:57:52 PM by kramerog »
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