Author Topic: Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef  (Read 3566 times)

Offline bluesman

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8689
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef
« on: March 15, 2012, 09:18:34 AM »
A beer brined corned beef recipe from Draft Magazine.

Sounds good.  8)

http://draftmag.com/recipes/detail/201
Ron Price

Offline bo

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1141
    • View Profile
Re: Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2012, 09:20:35 AM »
A beer brined corned beef recipe from Draft Magazine.

Sounds good.  8)

http://draftmag.com/recipes/detail/201


It's not like any corned beef I've ever made, but I can't see why it wouldn't be good.

Offline The Professor

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 769
  • "In the next life, you're on your own"
    • View Profile
Re: Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2012, 10:08:33 AM »
The concept is good...I just hope that the instruction to boil it for 3 hours was either a misprint or bad editing. 
If you choose to cook a corned beef immersed in liquid (as is commonly done),  once it comes to initial boil it should be immediately reduced to a simmer.   The 3 hours cooking time does sound  about right, depending on the size of the brisket you use.  Brisket is a tough and stringy cut of beef...you certainly don't want to undercook it.

Having worked for a time in a deli, I can also offer this:  If you really want to adapt this to the way NY's Carnegie Deli or Katz's do their amazingly succulent corned beef, you don't even want to immerse it at all.  After the beer brining of the meat as described, at cooking time  it should be placed on a rack over the liquid, in a covered pot, so the brisket steams rather than boils or simmers.  You get the same (or better) tenderness as you would with cooking it in liquid, but the meat seems to come out much more flavorful with steaming.
AL
New Brunswick, NJ
[499.6, 101.2] Apparent Rennerian
Homebrewer since July 1971

Offline bo

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1141
    • View Profile
Re: Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2012, 10:14:01 AM »
The concept is good...I just hope that the instruction to boil it for 3 hours was either a misprint or bad editing. 
If you choose to cook a corned beef immersed in liquid (as is commonly done),  once it comes to initial boil it should be immediately reduced to a simmer.   The 3 hours cooking time does sound  about right, depending on the size of the brisket you use.  Brisket is a tough and stringy cut of beef...you certainly don't want to undercook it.

Having worked for a time in a deli, I can also offer this:  If you really want to adapt this to the way NY's Carnegie Deli or Katz's do their amazingly succulent corned beef, you don't even want to immerse it at all.  After the beer brining of the meat as described, at cooking time  it should be placed on a rack over the liquid, in a covered pot, so the brisket steams rather than boils or simmers.  You get the same (or better) tenderness as you would with cooking it in liquid, but the meat seems to come out much more flavorful with steaming.


Wouldn't just placing it over plain steaming water (no spices) accomplish about the same thing? Would the spices really come through in a steaming process?

Offline garc_mall

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 795
  • [1892.9, 294.9deg] AR Lynnwood, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2012, 10:20:50 AM »
Does anyone have a time machine? There isn't 6 days between now and Saturday...

Maybe I will do a late St Patrick's day...
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
Fermenting: Flanders Red, Saison

Offline tschmidlin

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8131
  • Redmond, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2012, 12:42:22 AM »
I need to try this next time, I did my standard this time.  Steaming, eh Prof?  I need to try that!

So after you brine and then rinse it. do you rub it again or throw the spices in the liquid for steaming?
Tom Schmidlin

Offline garc_mall

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 795
  • [1892.9, 294.9deg] AR Lynnwood, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2012, 12:13:53 PM »
So, this is just about to go into the pot. I am taking it over to the in-laws tonight for dinner. I will post a review tomorrow before I start brewing!
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
Fermenting: Flanders Red, Saison

Offline garc_mall

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 795
  • [1892.9, 294.9deg] AR Lynnwood, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2012, 12:36:35 PM »
If the professor happens to be paying attention, I have a question. I don't have a big enough pot, but if I were to put a tray of the brine in my oven, with the brisket on the rack above, at about 250, do you think that would work? My oven has a decent seal, and should be able to keep it pretty steamy in there, though probably not as steamy as in a big roaster pot.

Now I have another thing to add to my wishlist, Thanks AHA Forum! ;)
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
Fermenting: Flanders Red, Saison

Offline euge

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 7247
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2012, 06:25:58 PM »
Are you doing a whole Brisket or just the flat? No roasting pans, casserole dishes or something you'd do lasagna in that you could cover with foil?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline garc_mall

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 795
  • [1892.9, 294.9deg] AR Lynnwood, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Tony’s Anchor Steam Corned Beef
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2012, 12:27:27 PM »
So, I chose to simmer the Brisket flat, rather than try to jerry-rig some crazy contraption to try and steam it. I will try to steam it next time, if I can get a large roaster pan that I can cover with foil. It turned out great. It was not the same color as the storebought corned beef, but I expected that, because I didn't use any nitrates or nitrites. It had a really great flavor, and was nice and tender. I brought it over to the in-laws, and they really enjoyed it. All in all, I am definitely going to have to make it again.
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
Fermenting: Flanders Red, Saison