Author Topic: Ferm Temp  (Read 973 times)

Offline tfrankmac

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Ferm Temp
« on: March 15, 2012, 06:07:33 PM »
I'm brewing up a batch of the NB English Bitter (my second batch of beer) with the Wyeast 1945 Neobritannia and my current ferm temps (using the Fermometer as a reference) are between 70-74℉ with an ambient temp of around 68-70℉ . Should I be concerned with the upper tier of this temp range currently, with this yeast listed as 66-74℉ ? I took a temp reading of the wort this afternoon (about 24 hours into fermentation) and it was hovering around 70/72 so there is a bit of variation in the fermometer/thermometer temp.

Thanks!

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Ferm Temp
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2012, 06:17:15 PM »
I would bring the temperature down a few degrees slowly by putting the fermenter in a water bath and draping it with a towel.  Don't go too cold or you might shock the yeast.  If you can start out at 68F that would be good and then drop it a couple degrees more by applying a little ice to get it to that point.  Good luck.
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Offline tfrankmac

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Re: Ferm Temp
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2012, 10:00:49 AM »
Well I got the temp naturally down to about 68 by placing the carboy in the basement so hopefully it'll turn out alright!

Offline zorch

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Re: Ferm Temp
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2012, 03:35:45 PM »
First off, don't panic, you'll still have beer in the end.

At this point, the 'damage' is done.   The majority of esters, phenols, or other 'funky' flavors are produced by the yeast during that first 24-36 hours.    The time to worry about your fermentation temperature is before you pitch your yeast.   

I haven't used that yeast.  Who knows, you may love all the fermentation-derived character this beer will probably have.   But in general, the advise I have received from this board which has served me well is to:

- chill your wort down 3 degrees or so _below_ your desired fermentation temp before you pitch the yeast.
- realize that fermentation creates heat, so you need to account for your beer being 2-6 degrees (or so) warmer than your ambient temperatures.

Temperature control is really important for controlling the flavors in your beer.    The fact that you have a Fermometer already on your fermentation vessel is a point in your favor - This will help you figure out your best strategy for keeping temps under control.

Again, an English Bitter is supposed to have 'character', so I would bet this beer will turn out ok.   But next time, I'd advise you to start the fermentation off with the carboy in the basement.

Offline Alewyfe

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Re: Ferm Temp
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2012, 10:05:14 PM »
First off, don't panic, you'll still have beer in the end.

At this point, the 'damage' is done.   The majority of esters, phenols, or other 'funky' flavors are produced by the yeast during that first 24-36 hours.    The time to worry about your fermentation temperature is before you pitch your yeast.   

I haven't used that yeast.  Who knows, you may love all the fermentation-derived character this beer will probably have.   But in general, the advise I have received from this board which has served me well is to:

- chill your wort down 3 degrees or so _below_ your desired fermentation temp before you pitch the yeast.
- realize that fermentation creates heat, so you need to account for your beer being 2-6 degrees (or so) warmer than your ambient temperatures.

Temperature control is really important for controlling the flavors in your beer.    The fact that you have a Fermometer already on your fermentation vessel is a point in your favor - This will help you figure out your best strategy for keeping temps under control.

Again, an English Bitter is supposed to have 'character', so I would bet this beer will turn out ok.   But next time, I'd advise you to start the fermentation off with the carboy in the basement.


Zorch is absolutely right, bitters can have unique complexities contributed by the yeast.  Keep good notes on this batch's fermentation and then try it again at the lower temps. You may find that what you have just done produces your favorite results. Every batch provides a great learning opportunity if you keep good records. I've been pitching at lower than normal temps (for me anyway) and fermenting at lower temps than I had previously, and my bitters are not scoring as well as they have previously. They are very clean, and the comments I am receiving on the score sheets are that they lack dimension. So like I said, keep good notes, compare and decide what you like.
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Offline tfrankmac

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Re: Ferm Temp
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2012, 11:15:00 AM »
Thanks guys, I really appreciate all the feedback. I will definitely keep note of my ferm temps and the resulting quality/taste of the beer. I took all of your advice and cooled my wort further to the lower/mid 60's before pitching my 1332 Wyeast yesterday into my NB Caribou Slobber batch. I've got a happy bubbling airlock as we speak on that one with a perfect temp.