Author Topic: White gelatinous Matrix  (Read 1789 times)

Offline HydraulicSammich

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White gelatinous Matrix
« on: March 17, 2012, 12:00:25 PM »
I have been experiencing a white protein type, gelatinous matrix in my stored Saniclean.  I store a pint in a plastic spray bottle for keg post and whatever sanitation.  That bottle will have it in within a few days.  I also store a gallon in a plastic medical grade 4 liter jug.  It will have it within a few days also.  I use distilled water only.  The Saniclean is very clear with the matrix floating around near the bottom.  Anyone experience this?
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Offline gmac

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Re: White gelatinous Matrix
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2012, 12:49:12 PM »
Perhaps Morpheus can explain it. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqxwtEdxOCw&feature=related

(sorry, it's St Pat's day and I may have been drinking...)

Offline bo

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Re: White gelatinous Matrix
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2012, 01:00:48 PM »
I've never heard of Saniclean. Is that anything like Starsan?

Offline HydraulicSammich

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Re: White gelatinous Matrix
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2012, 01:02:58 PM »
It is the same thing as Starsan without the foaming agent in it.
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Offline punatic

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Re: White gelatinous Matrix
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2012, 01:36:07 PM »
How to compute the determinant of a matrix:

The determinant is the sum of product terms made up of elements from the matrix.

Each product term consists of n elements from the matrix.

Each product term includes one element from each row and one element from each column.

The number of product terms is equal to n! (where n! refers to n factorial).

By convention, the elements of each product term are arranged in ascending order of the left-hand (or row-designating) subscript.

To find the sign of each product term, we count the number of inversions needed to put the right-hand (or column-designating) subscripts in numerical order. If the number of inversions is even, the sign is positive; if odd, the sign is negative.

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