Author Topic: Lagering quality question  (Read 2651 times)

Offline weithman5

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Re: Lagering quality question
« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2012, 12:59:59 PM »
unless the beer was carbed prior to lagering there should not really be much co2 coming out of solution. a little because of the temp change and equilizing the partial pressures but i would not expect much.  and fwiw, i don't even see much air lock activity to begin with when i lager. i can do a 2 gallon batch in a 2 gallon bucket (there is still about 1/2 inch of airspace. and get no overflow, activity etc.0
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Re: Lagering quality question
« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2012, 01:11:52 PM »
I use 2206 frequently and I don't remember ever having it throw diacetyl.

One of the reasons it's my go-to lager yeast.
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: Lagering quality question
« Reply #17 on: March 28, 2012, 05:21:07 AM »
I use 2206 frequently and I don't remember ever having it throw diacetyl.

One of the reasons it's my go-to lager yeast.

SO, I ended up doing a D-Rest for 4 days per the Wyeast recommendation for 2206 and the activity picked up dramatically.  At the start of the D-Rest it was at 1.013 and I kegged it last night at 1.012.  So it dropped a point but that does not seem like a lot for 4 days of activity.  So what was the activity then?  Tom mentioned CO2 release by diacetyl reduction not being part of the pathway.  So what was happening?  As previously stated I thought it was due to the yeast cleaning up the beer but now I'm thoroughly confused..... ???

Sorry to hijack the thread, but it still seems to fit with the OP and subsequent replies.
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Offline brewmichigan

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Re: Lagering quality question
« Reply #18 on: March 28, 2012, 05:45:34 AM »

Americans, Japanese, Belgians, Indians and Eskimos also don't do diacetyl rests so long as they pitch the correct amount of yeast and ferment properly.  However, with some strains a diacetyl rest is still recommended.  See below from the Wyeast website:

"YEAST STRAIN: 2206  |  Bavarian Lager
Used by many German breweries to produce rich, full-bodied, malty beers, this strain is a good choice for bocks and dopplebocks. A thorough diacetyl rest is recommended after fermentation is complete."

Dave

I believe Wyeast and Whitelabs put these kinds of statements in their descriptions because their expecting people to under pitch and stress the yeast. When the yeast become stressed, they will throw off more diacetyl, amongst other compounds. By letting it warm up that can help the yeast clean up it's own mess.  :D

As long as you're pitching the right amount of yeast, you may not need a diacetyl rest.

SO, I ended up doing a D-Rest for 4 days per the Wyeast recommendation for 2206 and the activity picked up dramatically.  At the start of the D-Rest it was at 1.013 and I kegged it last night at 1.012.  So it dropped a point but that does not seem like a lot for 4 days of activity.  So what was the activity then?  Tom mentioned CO2 release by diacetyl reduction not being part of the pathway.  So what was happening?  As previously stated I thought it was due to the yeast cleaning up the beer but now I'm thoroughly confused..... ???

Sorry to hijack the thread, but it still seems to fit with the OP and subsequent replies.


Since you're moving from lager fermentation temps to pretty much room temp, there would be much more CO2 released than what you would see with ales. Colder liquids absorb CO2 much better than warmer liquids. I'm betting this is what you saw.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2012, 05:51:24 AM by brewmichigan »
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Lagering quality question
« Reply #19 on: March 28, 2012, 05:48:12 AM »
Thanks Mike.  Makes sense. 
Dave Zach

Offline brewmichigan

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Re: Lagering quality question
« Reply #20 on: March 28, 2012, 05:54:04 AM »
And FWIW, I use 2206 frequently and I don't remember ever having it throw diacetyl.

Your senses are just not as refined as the rest of us Denny. You wouldn't know what diacetyl is.  :P
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline denny

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Re: Lagering quality question
« Reply #21 on: March 28, 2012, 08:18:01 AM »
And FWIW, I use 2206 frequently and I don't remember ever having it throw diacetyl.

Your senses are just not as refined as the rest of us Denny. You wouldn't know what diacetyl is.  :P

Guess that's it, Mike....;)  Actually, I do have a bit of a problem tasting it, but I can always recognize it by the mouthfeel.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Lagering quality question
« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2012, 12:08:59 AM »
SO, I ended up doing a D-Rest for 4 days per the Wyeast recommendation for 2206 and the activity picked up dramatically.  At the start of the D-Rest it was at 1.013 and I kegged it last night at 1.012.  So it dropped a point but that does not seem like a lot for 4 days of activity.  So what was the activity then?  Tom mentioned CO2 release by diacetyl reduction not being part of the pathway.  So what was happening?  As previously stated I thought it was due to the yeast cleaning up the beer but now I'm thoroughly confused..... ???

Sorry to hijack the thread, but it still seems to fit with the OP and subsequent replies.
Like Mike said, most likely the beer was gassing off because of the temp rise.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Lagering quality question
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2012, 05:26:41 AM »
Yep, thanks Tom.  I also think I got caught up in the yeast coming back in to suspension and taking it down another gravity point when the temp was raised.  Another learning experience!

Dave
Dave Zach