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abraxas:
My sister is going to make a batch of wine tomorrow from a kit.  She accidentally bought purified water instead of spring water, so I told her it would be best to use tap water and to dechlorinate it.  Looking into this I am finding that my city likely uses chloramine so it would probably be best for her to use Campden tablets to dechlorinate/clean the water.

I am wondering how much is the right amount to use.  http://www.byo.com/component/resource/article/906-i-recently-moved-to-a-city-that-uses-chloramine-in-the-water-supply-it-was-suggested-that-adding-sodium-metabisulfite-to-the-water-would-clear-the-beer-of-this-compound-is-this-true states that one 1/2 ounce campden tablet will chlorinate 20 gallons.  My tablets are Sodium Meta and they are .7 grams each which would mean I would need approximately 5 for a similar ratio.  I have also read that the sodium meta is 1/2 as strong so she would likely need 10 tablets.

It seems obvious that my old Campden tablets are not the standard 1/2 ounce K-meta that is the standard today.  Is Sodium Meta ok to use (it seems like potassium meta is preferred)?  Should she use 1/8 or 1/4 ounce, or should she go with some other method of de-chloramination?  There is a brew store by my work and it would only delay it.

Also, since I don't know much about this, how long is it before Campden tablets deactivate.  It seems like they work pretty quick and deactivate just as quickly but I always though I had read that one should wait a day after adding them to add yeasy, maybe I am misremembering....

Thanks


beerocd:

--- Quote from: abraxas on February 03, 2010, 08:48:34 PM ---My sister is going to make a batch of wine tomorrow from a kit.  She accidentally bought purified water instead of spring water,



--- End quote ---

Go out and buy Spring Water. Easier, cheaper. Just look at it this way: 6 more gallons of water less than $10, Screwed batch of wine...what 70 to 180 depending on the kit? The time you spent researching this I bet you coulda bought the other water already.  ;)

You can use the purified water for mixing up your sanitizer.

dontblake:
Why not just throw some brewing salts in that purified water?
Assuming of course you have some Gypsum, Baking soda, Salt, Epsom Salt, Chalk laying around.

abraxas:

--- Quote from: beerocd on February 03, 2010, 10:10:58 PM ---
--- Quote from: abraxas on February 03, 2010, 08:48:34 PM ---My sister is going to make a batch of wine tomorrow from a kit.  She accidentally bought purified water instead of spring water,



--- End quote ---

Go out and buy Spring Water. Easier, cheaper. Just look at it this way: 6 more gallons of water less than $10, Screwed batch of wine...what 70 to 180 depending on the kit? The time you spent researching this I bet you coulda bought the other water already.  ;)

You can use the purified water for mixing up your sanitizer.

--- End quote ---


Of course, but then I wouldn't' learn anything.  I brew enough that I don't want to be stuck buying spring water all of the time.  It's enough money and waste of containers/time, plus I have no guarantees of consistency on the source (maybe I could research this).  Being able to throw a tablet in some water the night (or 24 hours before I brew) seems a whole lot easier.

Until this point I had always assumed that the chlorine in the water was reduced/eliminated just by bringing the water up to temp for my mash/sparge.  I had no idea about the chloramine in my city and lower degree of efficiency of boiling for removal. 

I know I could invest in some type of filtration system, but then I have to worry about other minerals being stripped from the water.

mrdrysdale64:
My understanding it that it takes one camden tablet (potassium metabisulfite) to treat 20 gallons of water. I generally carbon filter 10 gallons of water at a time (I have two 5 gallons containers) and add one quarter of a tablet (crushed) to each container. I let them sit anywhere from over night to 24 hours. I am "assuming" that this takes care of the chloramines. I leave the containers open also. I am "assuming" that the chloramines are gassed off at this point. One of these days I am going to send a filtered, treated water sample to ward labs.

As far as using purified water for your wine kits; I assume you mean distilled water? There are enough minerals and nutrients in the must for a good fermentation. I am more worried about the tap water changing the wine than what might be missing from purified/distilled water.

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