Author Topic: a question about pickling lime v. chalk  (Read 6802 times)

Offline nateo

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Re: a question about pickling lime v. chalk
« Reply #45 on: May 02, 2012, 07:01:05 AM »
The reason I recommend against the strips is that I don't find them to be accurate.  I wouldn't want to raise mash pH by 0.2 or more in error.

Bru'n, if followed correctly with accurate water inputs, always gets me within +/-0.1 of my target mash pH. The issue I think is operator error. If you're trusting a water report that might be outdated, or if you mis-measure a water volume or mineral addition, it's pretty easy to mess up your mash. There have been a few times where I missed something and my results were worse than +/-0.1 and required further futzing to get in the proper range.

I think precision pH strips much better than nothing, and are accurate enough for a "go/no go" evaluation of the general mash range, but not nearly accurate to target a specific mash pH. 
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Offline narcout

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Re: a question about pickling lime v. chalk
« Reply #46 on: May 02, 2012, 08:45:22 AM »
That higher pH target also helps me understand why so many brewers using RO or distilled water have to reserve their roast grains from the main mash.  That process helps moderate the problems of a too low mash and also allows the mash to naturally increase its pH as the mash progresses.  That moves the pH closer to a range that the roast color and extraction is going to appreciate.

I started experimenting with that technique a few months ago after reading about it in Brewing Better Beer, and I think it has significantly improved my darker beers.  It also has the beneficial side effect of keeping my sparge pH in line.


Offline positiverpr

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Re: a question about pickling lime v. chalk
« Reply #47 on: May 03, 2012, 02:23:43 PM »
since reading everything that i could from aj/kai/martin about 18 months ago and switching from palmers spreadsheet to bru'n water(and from chalk to lime) my mash ph has been much more predictable(+-0.1) and both my light and dark beers have improved significantly(no lime in the lighter beers obviously). no side by sides done but the difference was obvious enough to me so as not to need one to convince me. go ahead and switch and never look back- you wont be sorry.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2012, 02:27:24 PM by positiverpr »

Offline beersk

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Re: a question about pickling lime v. chalk
« Reply #48 on: May 04, 2012, 08:26:21 AM »
So, basically what Martin is saying is that shooting for a higher mash pH of 5.5 or so, makes roasted grains taste smoother?
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Offline nateo

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Re: a question about pickling lime v. chalk
« Reply #49 on: May 04, 2012, 09:05:56 AM »
So, basically what Martin is saying is that shooting for a higher mash pH of 5.5 or so, makes roasted grains taste smoother?

Yep. I think it's like how apple cider can taste limp and boring if it's not acidic enough.
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Offline beersk

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Re: a question about pickling lime v. chalk
« Reply #50 on: May 04, 2012, 11:12:01 AM »
So, basically what Martin is saying is that shooting for a higher mash pH of 5.5 or so, makes roasted grains taste smoother?

Yep. I think it's like how apple cider can taste limp and boring if it's not acidic enough.
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