Author Topic: Wheat malt  (Read 1930 times)

Offline redbeerman

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Wheat malt
« on: April 30, 2012, 04:58:31 AM »
I have noticed that I have to practically pulverize wheat malt in order to get it to convert well.  I do not have this issue with flaked wheat.  I am wondering if it is because of the hardness of the grain.  This would make sense.  This is an observation made over the years when making German style wheat beers (this particular one was a Berliner Weisse).
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: Wheat malt
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2012, 05:23:45 AM »
I've long noted that my efficiency is reduced by several points when mashing a high wheat malt content grist.  I don't know why that is, but its another data point for your argument.
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Offline nateo

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Re: Wheat malt
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2012, 07:27:23 AM »
I really hate milling wheat malt. I generally have to run it through at least twice, frequently three times to get a decent crush. Friability is a rough indicator of how well the starches will become available in the mash, and wheat malt is consistently the least friable malt I've used. I've found large amounts of wheat to be one of the (IMO few) times decoction mashing is appropriate. The uptick in efficiency from the decoction neutralizes the downtick from using lots of wheat malt.
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Wheat malt
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2012, 04:41:36 AM »
From other brewers I have talked to, the consensus is that wheat malt needs to be run through the mill a number of times to get to the point where it converts well in the mash.  What I have noticed is that wheat malt is very hard and even after crushing it does not turn to powder as does barley malt.  This is most likely the reason for the lack of conversion over a normal single infusion mash schedule.  JMO and am open to other explanations.
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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Wheat malt
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2012, 07:40:43 AM »
I've always liked torrefied wheat as at least a partial substitute for wheat malt.

Better crush, lauters more readily. I don't know if it converts better than wheat malt - it does convert better than flaked or raw wheat.

I've never done a side-by-side flavor comparison, and I don't brew wheat beers enough to notice the flavor variations, but the flavor contribution is (at least) pretty close to wheat malt.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Wheat malt
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2012, 07:45:46 AM »
I use Best Wheat malt and don't have any of the issues you guys speak of. Kernal size is same as most 2 row. I do usually mash a little lower and longer to assure maximum ferment ability and conversion.
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Offline a10t2

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Re: Wheat malt
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2012, 08:01:50 AM »
Assuming your mill is adjustable, it's a good idea to tighten down the gap when crushing wheat. Like Jim said, the smaller and harder kernels tend to break into large pieces rather than being pulverized.

If you brew with wheat a lot, it might make sense to have a cheap (Corona) mill just for the wheat malt.
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Offline nateo

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Re: Wheat malt
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2012, 08:52:35 AM »
If you brew with wheat a lot, it might make sense to have a cheap (Corona) mill just for the wheat malt.

That's a good idea.

I use Best Wheat malt and don't have any of the issues you guys speak of. Kernal size is same as most 2 row. I do usually mash a little lower and longer to assure maximum ferment ability and conversion.

I've got about 1/4 of a sack left from a small maltster in CO. It's pretty undermodified. I'll be interested to see how a sack from a bigger malt company compares.
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Offline farmbrew

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Re: Wheat malt
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2012, 09:26:52 AM »

Yes, it's a real bind when you have to mill for an extra half hour . Had same problem with wheat malt and it's worse with rye malt.

The corona mill idea is a good one...I've seen big old-fashioned coffee mills (with handles) used to good effect too.

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