Author Topic: what are the  (Read 911 times)

Offline dannyj621

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 85
  • humble beginnings
    • View Profile
what are the
« on: February 04, 2010, 08:10:28 PM »
what are the necessities to make the switch from extract to partial and than all the way to all grain?
when in rome we shall do as the romans.  When in hell we'll take shots at the bar

boulderbrewer

  • Guest
Re: what are the
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2010, 08:18:12 PM »
http://hbd.org/cascade/dennybrew/ is the first start. Then the notion that you can boil in more than one pot. When I went AG I boiled in 3 sometimes for pots on the stove. I had only small pots a 4,3 and 2 gallon SS pot kit. But a turkey burner with a 7 g pot is not that expensive.

Offline a10t2

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3163
  • Ask me why I don't like Chico!
    • View Profile
    • SeanTerrill.com
Re: what are the
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2010, 08:33:58 PM »
Basically, to go from extract to partial mashing, all you need is a grain bag. I used this technique for a while, with great results. http://seanterrill.com/2009/04/09/good-beer-easy-beer/

To go AG you'll really want a dedicated mash/lauter tun, like the link Boulder posted. That can be put together for as little as ~$30, less if you already have a cooler.

Most people who go AG move to full boils (using a propane burner) at the same time, but you certainly don't have to make both moves together. To really see the cost savings of all grain, full boils are necessary though. Another intermediate step would be to switch to 2-3 gallon batches for a while.
Beer is like porn. You can buy it, but it's more fun to make your own.
http://seanterrill.com/category/brewing/

Offline dontblake

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 101
    • View Profile
    • Indian Peaks Alers
Re: what are the
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2010, 08:24:55 AM »
Step 1)  Get a burner and large brewpot (around 10 gal) to do full-wort boils.   Keep doing extract batches so you can get the other parts of your process nailed.
Step 2)  to do partial mashes, it can be as simple as a10t2 says - get a grain bag.   You can put your grains inside, mash in your original brewpot (I'm assuming 2.5-3 gal).   then when you want to sparge, you can simply use it like a giant tea bag and dunk it in 3 or so gallons of 168F water in your large brew pot.   You can also go as far as making a mini mash/lauter tun with a cooler and false bottom, but you should probably just make a bigger one and go all grain
Step 3)  Get yourself a big (at least 10 gal) cooler, build a false bottom/manifold/ss braid and build a real mash tun.   By this time, you have everything you'll need for simple batch sparging - your large kettle, burner, small kettle (for heating strike water and sparge water) and your mas tun. 
Don Blake, Erie CO
Founder, Indian Peaks Alers
Master BJCP Judge

Offline Thirsty_Monk

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1842
  • Eau Claire WI
    • View Profile
Re: what are the
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2010, 09:31:00 AM »
Step 1)  Get a burner and large brewpot (around 10 gal) to do full-wort boils.   Keep doing extract batches so you can get the other parts of your process nailed.

I agree with dontblake

1) sanitation
-- good cleaning and sanitation process
2) fermentation
-- pitch enough yeast (starters and repitching)
-- temp controlled fermentation (fridge/freezer +temp controller)
3) kegging
4) all grain
-- full boil pot (for 5 gal batches 10 gal pot)
-- wort chiller (hope you already have that)
-- cooler with false bottom/ss braid/manifold ... (that is beginning)
-- brewing software (that will tell you your strike temp and water amount)
Na Zdravie

On Tap At The TapRoom:
Bohemian Pilsner
Bohemian Dark Lager
Smoked Bock
MaiBock
American Brown Ale
Marzen
Root beer

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11665
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: what are the
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2010, 09:32:23 AM »
You don't necessarily need to do a full boil to do partial mash or AG beers.  It certainly can help your efficiency, but it's not a  drop dead requirement.  Or you can reduce your batch size and do a full boil.  I used both of those techniques in the past.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline lupy

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 71
    • View Profile
Re: what are the
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2010, 03:06:21 PM »
If you intend to go AG 'eventually', you should just do it now.

-A turkey fryer with a pot. 8gal or more if available. (7.5gal is too tight for a typical 5gal batch, but I don't use fermcap...yet.)
-A dedicated MLT with a SS braid and a drain hose.
-Stuff you already own.
..........and yer' brewing "all grain".
After you've done it once, you will have a lot of answers and a whole new set of questions.
 
I must caveat by saying that I have never partial mashed and I've only done two extract kits.
For me, the whole and/or crushed grains were too appealing to not want to eliminate the plastic jug of LME.
$2 words for a 2¢ story

Offline novabrew

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 85
  • Springfield, VA
    • View Profile
Re: what are the
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2010, 03:16:03 PM »
Don't forget the dedication needed to make good beer.  There is a little more effort doing all grain brews, keep that in mind.  It is worth it.

brewboy

  • Guest
Re: what are the
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2010, 03:44:47 PM »
Quote
If you intend to go AG 'eventually', you should just do it now.   

I agree. After doing 2 partial mashes, I decided I was spending about the same time as I would with all grain and more money on extracts. I switched to AG and never looked back.

Offline homebrewgamecock

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 79
  • Westminster, CO
    • View Profile
Re: what are the
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2010, 06:18:27 PM »
I went from extract to AG.  I have never done a partial mash.  Thankfully I met a guy that lent me an extra brew system he had for all grain, so I did not have to invest in equipment right away.  He also taught me to brew. 

AG is not hard at all.  You need some different equipment and that's about it IMO.