Author Topic: DR on a vienna  (Read 2641 times)

Offline jmcamerlengo

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 625
    • View Profile
Re: DR on a vienna
« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2012, 11:36:38 AM »
Sounds like everything is under control.  However I agree with the guys above and primary for at least 3 weeks.  8 days seems a bit short to me, even with a large starter.

7-10 days is about when an average-gravity lager reaches FG, IME.

True, it's probably finished and if a D-Rest is necessary, then agreed a good time to raise it up.  I've not been doing D-Rests but have been away from 2206 per your post below.  I've been using 2308, 2035 and 2124.  The last light lager I used 2206 for I did a 4 day D-Rest, but after a 16 day primary....

Dave

2206 is one of the ones I use frequently, never needed a Drest ime.
Jason
-Head Brewer, Brewtus Brewers in the Shenango Valley. Hopefully opening a brewpub/nano brewery in the next couple years.

Offline Pi

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 312
  • "I would never trade tomorrow for today"
    • View Profile
Re: DR on a vienna
« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2012, 11:56:15 AM »
OK check this out. http://scottishcraftbrewers.org/?p=805
I think my next lager i will ferment a little longer and do the "Forced Diacetyl Test". I did an american light lager a couple months back. It tasted great when i first bottled but after sitting around it has developed diacetyl. Guess it had acetolactate?
Primary:Stella Rosemary IPA
Lagering: Sto Lat Gratzer
Drinking: Whenever I'm not working or driving

Offline davidgzach

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1498
    • View Profile
Re: DR on a vienna
« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2012, 12:01:06 PM »
Sounds like everything is under control.  However I agree with the guys above and primary for at least 3 weeks.  8 days seems a bit short to me, even with a large starter.

7-10 days is about when an average-gravity lager reaches FG, IME.

True, it's probably finished and if a D-Rest is necessary, then agreed a good time to raise it up.  I've not been doing D-Rests but have been away from 2206 per your post below.  I've been using 2308, 2035 and 2124.  The last light lager I used 2206 for I did a 4 day D-Rest, but after a 16 day primary....

Dave

2206 is one of the ones I use frequently, never needed a Drest ime.

I happened to look it up on the Wyeast website when using for a Becks clone just to see it's stats.  It recommended a D-Rest so I went with it.  I've heard several since that, like you, have not done one with it with good results.  Brew and learn....
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 12:03:55 PM by davidgzach »
Dave Zach

Offline jmcamerlengo

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 625
    • View Profile
Re: DR on a vienna
« Reply #18 on: May 08, 2012, 12:03:53 PM »
You got it Dave! And my experience may be different than yours. If a D-rest works for you and you like the results, go with it!
Jason
-Head Brewer, Brewtus Brewers in the Shenango Valley. Hopefully opening a brewpub/nano brewery in the next couple years.

Offline a10t2

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3163
  • Ask me why I don't like Chico!
    • View Profile
    • SeanTerrill.com
Re: DR on a vienna
« Reply #19 on: May 09, 2012, 05:57:09 PM »
2206 is one of the ones I use frequently, never needed a Drest ime.

That's actually my experience too. The conventional wisdom is that it's a big diacetyl producer though.

OTOH I start ramping up the temperatures on all my beers after a few days, so it's been a while since I haven't done a "diacetyl rest".
Beer is like porn. You can buy it, but it's more fun to make your own.
http://seanterrill.com/category/brewing/

Offline jmcamerlengo

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 625
    • View Profile
Re: DR on a vienna
« Reply #20 on: May 15, 2012, 12:05:38 PM »
2206 is one of the ones I use frequently, never needed a Drest ime.

That's actually my experience too. The conventional wisdom is that it's a big diacetyl producer though.

OTOH I start ramping up the temperatures on all my beers after a few days, so it's been a while since I haven't done a "diacetyl rest".

I think that may be the case when you pitch warmer than you ferment. I think if you're pitching cooler than your ferment temp and slowly ramping to ferment temp diacetyl is largely a nonfactor...of course assuming your brewing procedure is sound.
Jason
-Head Brewer, Brewtus Brewers in the Shenango Valley. Hopefully opening a brewpub/nano brewery in the next couple years.