Author Topic: pleasant surprise  (Read 3940 times)

Offline DrewG

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pleasant surprise
« on: May 10, 2012, 03:17:11 AM »
My scottish 80 scored a 39.5 last weekend, good for a bronze. It was my first all grain beer and my first contest. Got dinged on mouthfeel for a dry finish, which i agreed with. I drove the temp up to finish the fermentation out, and i think it attenuated a bit too well.
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Offline tomsawyer

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2012, 05:22:52 AM »
Excellent score for a challenging style.

Raising the temp makes for lower attenuation.  You probably want to mash warmer to begin with, or step up to a beta temp eariler.  Or just use some more crystal, or boil some wort down to caramelize and add that.  Or include some carapils.  Lots of ways to skin that cat i guess.

Or better yet don't change a thing!
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Offline a10t2

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2012, 05:24:45 AM »
I think Drew meant that he raised the temperature toward the end of fermentation. Which is fine, and my SOP.

Doing that won't affect the attenuation limit of the wort, which as Lennie says is set in the mash.
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Offline anthony

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2012, 05:40:12 AM »
I wouldn't change a beer because of one set of scoresheets. Besides...
Quote
Mouthfeel: Medium-low to medium body. Low to moderate carbonation. Sometimes a bit creamy, but often quite dry due to use of roasted barley.

Overall Impression: Cleanly malty with a drying finish, perhaps a few esters, and on occasion a faint bit of peaty earthiness (smoke). Most beers finish fairly dry considering their relatively sweet palate, and as such have a different balance than strong Scotch ales.

I think the hardest part about that category (and some others) are all the preconceived notions; judges have a real difficult time just following the guidelines themselves.

Offline udubdawg

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2012, 05:50:50 AM »
congrats; that is an excellent first effort.  Heck it's excellent whenever.

how dry is this finish they dinged?  The style can finish quite dry...

Offline ccfoo242

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2012, 05:51:13 AM »
Congrats on your first all grain and first competition!

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Offline bluesman

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2012, 06:30:37 AM »
Congrats!  8)
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Offline nateo

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2012, 06:35:14 AM »
Good score. Dryness can be pretty tough to dial in properly, and it's hard to know what judges will want. The closer you get to the limit of attenuation, the drier it will seem.

Maybe it was just a little overcarbed? That can make beer seem too dry sometimes. IIRC the carbonation level for the style is only like 1-1.3 volumes, but maybe if you had carbed it that low judges wouldn't have cared for the low carbonation.

As Lennie mentioned, boiling wort down to a caramel is a great way to add depth and complexity to beer. That's my SOP for all British styles (even my bitters).
« Last Edit: May 10, 2012, 06:36:45 AM by nateo »
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Offline tomsawyer

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2012, 02:01:17 PM »
Did kind of blow that diagnosis, thanks all for making me sound slightly less stupid.

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Offline DrewG

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2012, 09:37:37 AM »
Thanks folks. I got a lot of advice from these forums that helped a lot.

Quote
I think Drew meant that he raised the temperature toward the end of fermentation. Which is fine, and my SOP.

Yep.

Quote
how dry is this finish they dinged?  The style can finish quite dry...

I didn't think it was excessively dry, but thats just me. I'll check the scoresheet when I get home and post the comments

Quote
Maybe it was just a little overcarbed? That can make beer seem too dry sometimes. IIRC the carbonation level for the style is only like 1-1.3 volumes, but maybe if you had carbed it that low judges wouldn't have cared for the low carbonation.

I think that it was a bit overcarbed, you're probably right on with that thought.



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Offline Alewyfe

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2012, 10:12:45 AM »
As Lennie mentioned, boiling wort down to a caramel is a great way to add depth and complexity to beer. That's my SOP for all British styles (even my bitters).

Can you expand on this idea for me. Pull off some first runnings or at the end of boil? Typical quantity pulled off for say a 5 gal. batch..Ordinary vs say an ESB. This is new to me, but I like the possibilities.....and how dark do you typically let it get?
« Last Edit: May 14, 2012, 10:53:17 AM by dbeechum »
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Offline dbeechum

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2012, 10:54:48 AM »
Typical way of doing this is to pull the first 1/2 gallon - 1 gallon of first runnings and  boil that until reduced by half.

I would do it for an ESB. Ordinary, maybe not.
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Offline Alewyfe

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2012, 11:06:07 AM »
Typical way of doing this is to pull the first 1/2 gallon - 1 gallon of first runnings and  boil that until reduced by half.

I would do it for an ESB. Ordinary, maybe not.

Thanks Drew. Any styles beside the ESB and Scottish that this might be used for?

You look a lot older in your forum pic than on the BS Podcast. The picture here must be the one off your fake ID. ;)  Enjoyed the podcast and have gotten a lot of ideas from you for stuff to do with our club.
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Offline nateo

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2012, 11:29:26 AM »
What Drew described is basically what I do. I pull about 1 gallon of first runnings, then boil that down to at least 1/2 the original volume, smaller volume if I can.

I don't care for crystal-type malts, so I almost never keep them on hand. When I do want something with some malty/caramel character, I'll boil some first runnings down. My ordinary bitter is just Golden Promise + boiled first runnings, and I'll boil it down from 1 gallon to 1/2 gallon.

For an ESB I'll pull more volume, say 1.5 gallons and try to get it down to 1/2 gallon or less. I can't describe it more than that, but basically just watch it, keep stirring, and it wouldn't hurt to pull samples, let them cool, then taste them, if you're not sure what you're doing. Let your tongue guide you.
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Offline Alewyfe

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Re: pleasant surprise
« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2012, 12:38:23 PM »
Excellent. I will no longer sweat running out of crystal. Yet another technique for the arsenal.
Diane
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