Author Topic: Farmhouse Ale help  (Read 5394 times)

Offline poobah58

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Farmhouse Ale help
« on: May 22, 2012, 03:48:33 AM »
Looks like this is going to be Friday nite's brew. Looking for something similar to Red Sky at Night by Clipper City but slightly less alcohol. Your thoughts, particularly the mash and ferment temps:

Chapin Farmhouse Ale

7 lbs Pilsen (1.8 SRM) 70.00 %
8.0 oz CaraVienne (20.0 SRM) 5.00 %
8.0 oz Munich Malt (9.0 SRM) 5.00 %
8.0 oz Vienna Malt (3.0 SRM) 5.00 %
8.0 oz Wheat, Flaked (1.6 SRM) 5.00 %
8.0 oz Wheat, Torrified (1.7 SRM) 5.00 %
8.0 oz Honey (1.0 SRM) 5.00 %
0.50 oz Glacier [5.10 %] (90 min) (FWH) 8.2 IBU
0.50 oz Palisade [8.40 %] (60 min) 16.9 IBU
0.50 oz Palisade [8.40 %] (10 min) 3.4 IBU
0.125 tsp Lactic Acid (HLT)
1.00 lb Apricots, Pureed (Secondary 7.0 days)   
Farmhouse Ale (Wyeast Labs #3726) (1.2L starter)

Mash @ 148°F for 75 Min.
Ferment @ 82°F-84°F

OG:1.056
SRM: 5.2
IBU: 28.5
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Offline majorvices

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Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2012, 05:54:23 AM »
Is this for five gallons? That seems like an awful lot of crystal malt. It's gonna be sweet for the style.
Keith Y.
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Offline hokerer

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2012, 05:59:01 AM »
Is this for five gallons? That seems like an awful lot of crystal malt. It's gonna be sweet for the style.

A half pound is too much?
Joe

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Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2012, 06:31:33 AM »
My bad, I thought he had cara vienna and cara Munich. I see now its Munich.
Keith Y.
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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2012, 07:58:57 AM »
Get those apricots RIPE before you puree. Otherwise they don't offer up a whole lot of flavor (especially just 1 lb).

I'm not much for the Dupont strain (esp. if you haven't done a farmhouse before), but many saison lovers' cravings aren't quenched without that flavor profile!

If you're sticking with it - start a little lower (75F or so) and start bumping it up as fermentation subsides (i.e. airlock bubbles slow). ~ 2F per day up to the low 80s.

This way, you don't risk the fermentation temp getting too high at high krausen.
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Offline dbeechum

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2012, 08:06:06 AM »
After last year's experiments, here's my thoughts:

I think with the CaraVienne, the munich and the vienna you're going to make a very toasty noted beer. If that's what you're aiming, then go forth.

On the yeast - here's how I always have success with my Belgians - start cooler than you want to ferment at: say 65F - healthy pitch - then let it free rise. In the case of the 3726 I wouldn't go much higher than 75F and one of the things I really learned last year - don't try to force the temp up with a lot of external heat.
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Offline Greg A.

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2012, 09:34:06 AM »
After last year's experiments, here's my thoughts:

I think with the CaraVienne, the munich and the vienna you're going to make a very toasty noted beer. If that's what you're aiming, then go forth.

On the yeast - here's how I always have success with my Belgians - start cooler than you want to ferment at: say 65F - healthy pitch - then let it free rise. In the case of the 3726 I wouldn't go much higher than 75F and one of the things I really learned last year - don't try to force the temp up with a lot of external heat.

Do you have a recommendation for allowing it to free rise and hit the temp that you're aiming for in the end?  Do you keep the ambient temperature of your chamber a constant temperature and just let it rise (and perhaps fall) as it wishes?  I do not have much experience with belgian yeast strains but I want to learn more since these are my favorite styles. 

What would you do if you have a strain that has a range of 66-72 degrees and you want the yeast to free rise from 66 up to 72 and then maintain 72 for a couple of days?  Any tips?
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Offline poobah58

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2012, 04:16:48 PM »
Get those apricots RIPE before you puree. Otherwise they don't offer up a whole lot of flavor (especially just 1 lb).

I'm not much for the Dupont strain (esp. if you haven't done a farmhouse before), but many saison lovers' cravings aren't quenched without that flavor profile!

If you're sticking with it - start a little lower (75F or so) and start bumping it up as fermentation subsides (i.e. airlock bubbles slow). ~ 2F per day up to the low 80s.

This way, you don't risk the fermentation temp getting too high at high krausen.
I'm going with the canned stuff. Works out to 3# for a 15 gallon batch. I don't want too much from the fruit. Just want to know it's there...
You can't drink all day if you don't start in the morning!

Offline poobah58

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2012, 04:24:37 PM »
After last year's experiments, here's my thoughts:

I think with the CaraVienne, the munich and the vienna you're going to make a very toasty noted beer. If that's what you're aiming, then go forth.

On the yeast - here's how I always have success with my Belgians - start cooler than you want to ferment at: say 65F - healthy pitch - then let it free rise. In the case of the 3726 I wouldn't go much higher than 75F and one of the things I really learned last year - don't try to force the temp up with a lot of external heat.
I need a little toastyness in there. I like them dry but SWMBO on the otherhand......
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Offline poobah58

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2012, 04:26:45 PM »
Have you gents used this yeast before? I'm so confused over this yeast. I've used WY3711, WY3787 and WY1214 and ferment low and ramp up as you state. I read (don't remember where) where this one will stall if pitched too low. I'll keep researching but will probably take your advise.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2012, 08:08:56 PM »
I'm going with the canned stuff. Works out to 3# for a 15 gallon batch. I don't want too much from the fruit. Just want to know it's there...
If you're just looking for a hint I'd go with a lot more than 3# for 15 gallons.  I'd probably go with 6# to start, and maybe more like 9#.  Apricots are really mild, I don't think it will come through very strong.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline poobah58

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2012, 04:14:21 AM »
I'm going with the canned stuff. Works out to 3# for a 15 gallon batch. I don't want too much from the fruit. Just want to know it's there...
If you're just looking for a hint I'd go with a lot more than 3# for 15 gallons.  I'd probably go with 6# to start, and maybe more like 9#.  Apricots are really mild, I don't think it will come through very strong.
Had no idea. Thanks for the heads up...
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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2012, 06:20:36 AM »
Have you gents used this yeast before? I'm so confused over this yeast. I've used WY3711, WY3787 and WY1214 and ferment low and ramp up as you state. I read (don't remember where) where this one will stall if pitched too low. I'll keep researching but will probably take your advise.

It will most likely stall (but not stop) either way, taking about 2 weeks to ferment out the rest of the way.

I like what Drew was saying about letting it free-rise and not putting too much heat to it.

A big point to that is that, if you're going to let the fermentation temp go up on its own, you cant start too high or the yeast will produce undesirable by-products.

That's why you start with a temp lower than your target temp. For most yeasts, in low to mid gravity worts (< 1.070), starting in the mid-60F's to start, you can count on about 5 deg F temp rise. This can vary with the yeast (disclaimer for Tom).

I use the temp rise but also keep it elevated with a heat belt. This is mostly because I ferment in a chest freezer - makes it pretty easy to under-shoot it.

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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2012, 04:06:36 PM »
I'm going with the canned stuff. Works out to 3# for a 15 gallon batch. I don't want too much from the fruit. Just want to know it's there...
If you're just looking for a hint I'd go with a lot more than 3# for 15 gallons.  I'd probably go with 6# to start, and maybe more like 9#.  Apricots are really mild, I don't think it will come through very strong.
Had no idea. Thanks for the heads up...
It really depends on the beer, but many people use 3# per 5 gallons.  The puree is supposed to give you more flavor, and if you want aroma then you should add extract.  I think Jamil and Tasty covered this in a CYBI for Magic Hat #9, and I think they settled on extract instead of puree.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline poobah58

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Re: Farmhouse Ale help
« Reply #14 on: May 23, 2012, 06:53:31 PM »
It really depends on the beer, but many people use 3# per 5 gallons.  The puree is supposed to give you more flavor, and if you want aroma then you should add extract.  I think Jamil and Tasty covered this in a CYBI for Magic Hat #9, and I think they settled on extract instead of puree.

Iv'e tried extracts before and just don't like them. Tastes like perfume and kinda fake tasting to me if that makes sense. I bought a 3# can and don't care to order more at this point (shipping is a killer). I think I'll go to the market and get a few lbs of fresh ones...
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