Author Topic: Algebraic solution for sugar syrup p/p/g numbers?  (Read 7807 times)

Offline nateo

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Re: Algebraic solution for sugar syrup p/p/g numbers?
« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2012, 02:34:13 PM »
So if I finish working through the problem:

[46pts*500g + 0pts*Xg] / 500 + Xg = 32pts

(500g + Xg)*[23000pts + 0] / (500g + Xg) = 32pts*(500g + Xg)

23000pts = 16000pts + 32Xg
7000 = 32X
X = 218.75g

218.75g + 500g = 718.75g

218.75 / 718.75 = 30% H2O, 70% Sucrose
« Last Edit: June 13, 2012, 03:21:18 PM by nateo »
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Offline tubercle

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Re: Algebraic solution for sugar syrup p/p/g numbers?
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2012, 02:54:31 PM »
I'm wondering if I'm thinking about this too hard. With a known quantity of sugar going into the syrup, I wonder if I could just do a simple dilution calculation to figure out the ppg figure.

I'm thinking something like [(points)*(sugar weight) + (points)*(water weight)] / (total weight)

So if I start with 500g sugar, and the end syrup weighs 750g, that'd be

(46 points)*(500g) + 0 points*250g / 750g = 30.6 points/pound/gallon

^ This. The sugar in the pint is the same as the sugar in your starting solution. The total points in that pint are the same as that in your original 500ml + of solution.

A pint's a pound the world around - Alton Brown.

as much as I love alton brown gotta call foul on this statement, and the attribution. I have no idea who said that originaly but it tweren't AB. also a pint of sugar syrup is not a pound. at 1.046 a pint is 1.046 pounds. a pint of honey weighs in at like 1.5 lbs. you can actually use this to determine gravity of a solution if you have acurate volume measurments and weight measurments.

(Pardon the spelling, I do not have integrated spell check at work  :'()

My understanding of "a pint is a pound the world around" was that it was an American memory tool.  One pint in America is 16 fluid oz and 1 pound American is 16 dry oz.  Those are 2 different units of measure and are not equal but people can generally remember that one pound is 16 oz. so 1 pint is too.  The phrase wasn't meant to indicate they were equal, just that they were the same number. 

None of this should be confused with the English pint though which is 20 fl. oz.

Just one of the many reason the metric system makes so much more sense.

Paul


My understanding of "a pint is a pound the world around" was that it was an American memory tool.

It is also useful for relative magnitude. Rounding to one significant figure, a gallon of water weighs 8 pounds. A pint is 1/8 of a gallon, which would make a pint of water weigh a pound (to one significant figure).


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 I don't know who said it orginally but I've heard AB say it a bunch of times. It is referenced to water specifically when using a baker's percentage . Water weighs 8.34 lbs/gallon. A pint is 1/8 of a gallon so 8.34/8 = 1.0425 lbs.

 I thought everyone knew this ;D

 I was trying to help th OP figure out his formula with a weight to weight comparasion.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2012, 02:56:25 PM by tubercle »
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