Author Topic: That German lager flavor  (Read 63050 times)

Offline redbeerman

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #285 on: December 28, 2012, 10:18:51 AM »
I lager in the primary fermenter (bucket) with an air lock.  I believe the low temperatures keep oxidation at bay.  At least I haven't had any issues with it.
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Offline musseldoc

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #286 on: December 28, 2012, 01:29:44 PM »
If you are using an airlock, then the headspace should be CO2 and keep you safe from oxidation (not indefinitely, but a while).  I think the most important variable is ensuring that yeast is present in whatever container you choose to lager your beer.  Obviously, if you leave it on the primary, then there is plenty of yeast.  However, if you are transferring to a keg or secondary carboy to lager, make sure you transfer the beer before you crash cool to lager temps.  This way, some yeast makes it over into your new lager vessel. 
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Offline tomsawyer

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #287 on: December 28, 2012, 02:16:23 PM »
I've never found the amount of yeast left suspended at the end of fermentation to be enough to keep things going.  I tend to give the beer a stir when I rack to a secondary, and really pull out a good amount of yeast.  Maybe 20% or more of whats in the bottom.
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Offline nateo

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #288 on: December 28, 2012, 03:34:33 PM »
I've never found the amount of yeast left suspended at the end of fermentation to be enough to keep things going.  I tend to give the beer a stir when I rack to a secondary, and really pull out a good amount of yeast.  Maybe 20% or more of whats in the bottom.

Yeah. I think a homebrewer is better served by waiting until the beer hits FG before lagering. Trying to lager the traditional way (before terminal gravity is reached) is begging for a stuck ferment.
In der Kürze liegt die Würze.

Offline beersk

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #289 on: May 23, 2013, 06:21:30 PM »
Resurrection! I'm hitting the German lagers hard again. I just had a Weihenstephaner Pilsner and damn was that good! Anyone brewing any good lagers lately? Maybe it's oxidation or something, but whatever makes that beer smell and taste so good, I want it!
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Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #290 on: May 23, 2013, 07:53:58 PM »
I think I am brewing some good lagers.
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On Tap At The TapRoom:
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Offline gmac

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #291 on: May 23, 2013, 09:27:48 PM »
I think I am brewing some good lagers.
I thought so when I had them.

Offline davidgzach

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #292 on: May 24, 2013, 04:14:12 AM »
Resurrection! I'm hitting the German lagers hard again. I just had a Weihenstephaner Pilsner and damn was that good! Anyone brewing any good lagers lately? Maybe it's oxidation or something, but whatever makes that beer smell and taste so good, I want it!

Got 4 x 5G in the chest freezer which will start to come down to 32F today for 3 weeks before kegging.  Just tapped a BoPils last night that made me smile!   :)

And 3 more kegs in the lager fridge!

Lager away man! 
« Last Edit: May 24, 2013, 04:17:41 AM by davidgzach »
Dave Zach

Offline beersk

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #293 on: May 24, 2013, 07:50:54 AM »
So jealous. I have a German Pilsner ale-style on tap right now that is pretty good. Not a lager, but resembles one. Any thoughts on Saflager 34/70? Is it basically the WY2124 strain in dry form?
I'm guessing Rahr pils malt is not a good choice for an authentic German lager, it doesn't seem to have that quality aboot it. While clean and tasty, it's missing something.
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #294 on: May 24, 2013, 08:08:38 AM »
Have not used 34/70 so can't help there at all besides that I've heard good things.....

I have used about all the Wyeast strains though and lean towards, in order: 2001, 2278 and 2124 for my BoPils.  For German Pils I use 2206 and 2308.  And I am about to tap a Spaten clone made with WLP860.  Really looking forward to that!  Tapping tomorrow on a camping trip!   :)

Dave


Dave Zach

Offline redbeerman

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #295 on: May 24, 2013, 08:23:42 AM »
34/70 is the Weihenstephaner strain.  I have used it a number of times, but had issues with diacetyl early on.  You need to pitch two packets reconstituted, and give it a good few days diacetyl rest close to finishing.  It seems to get better with subsequent generations.  I have found that liquid strains with ample starters work better in my experience.
CH3CH2OH - Without it, life itself would be impossible.

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Offline nateo

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #296 on: May 24, 2013, 09:14:39 AM »
S-189 is the best lager strain I've used. It's super easy to use, very clean, but not particularly "German" flavored. IIRC it's a Swiss lager strain.
In der Kürze liegt die Würze.

Offline narcout

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #297 on: May 24, 2013, 01:10:57 PM »
Anyone brewing any good lagers lately?

I tapped a keg of Munich Dunkel last night that I'm pretty happy with.  I don't brew much lager, but this beer has me reconsidering that approach.

Offline jeffy

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #298 on: May 24, 2013, 02:24:06 PM »
I've been brewing a few lagers lately.  I have a Double Bock on tap now (although a bit young), a CAP lagering and a German Pils fermenting.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
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Offline kmccaf

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Re: That German lager flavor
« Reply #299 on: May 24, 2013, 03:19:34 PM »
I have lagers sitting in the fridge that I am going to tap in a few weeks. A Czech Dark Lager (saflager 34/70), a Landbier (wlp 833), and a Baltic Porter. I got a little antsy and started drinking the Baltic, which has been hitting the spot this spring. Samples from the others have been very tasty.
So it goes.