Author Topic: Mash schedules for Lagers  (Read 8084 times)

Offline denny

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Re: Mash schedules for Lagers
« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2012, 10:21:16 AM »
I have heard of people using melanoidin malt to emulate a decoction mash...anyone tried this with any luck?

You have to start by assuming that there's a flavor addition from decoction.  I'm not sure I can say that.
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: Mash schedules for Lagers
« Reply #16 on: July 02, 2012, 05:22:36 AM »
Just had to add a thought to this thread.  IF the malts produced today are all well modified, why do all of the German breweries still perform Hochkurz mashes?  Yes, tradition is one thing, but if it didn't affect the flavor and quality of the beer, I would think they would all go to single infusion to save time and money.  Thoughts?

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Offline rabeb25

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Re: Mash schedules for Lagers
« Reply #17 on: July 02, 2012, 05:29:23 AM »
Do we ACTUALLY know they still do, the are unbelievably tight lipped about anything they do.
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Offline nateo

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Re: Mash schedules for Lagers
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2012, 05:45:16 AM »
A hochkurz infusion or decoction takes place only in the saccharification range, 142* and up. Would anyone argue saccharification rests at different temps would have no effect on wort composition?

AFAIK there is no, or very little, starch conversion that occurs during malting. Back to my original point about modification, anything that happens in the malt house (like protein degradation) doesn't have be duplicated in the brew house (like a protein rest). Anything that doesn't happen during malting (like starch conversion) has to happen in the brew house.   
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Offline beersk

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Re: Mash schedules for Lagers
« Reply #19 on: July 02, 2012, 06:30:09 AM »
I think Kai states on his website somewhere that most German breweries only do modified Hochkurz mash schedules these days.  They do a rest in the 140-145F range for a bit, decoct, then rest in the 158-162F range, then mash out.
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Offline denny

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Re: Mash schedules for Lagers
« Reply #20 on: July 02, 2012, 08:17:24 AM »
Do we ACTUALLY know they still do, the are unbelievably tight lipped about anything they do.

THIS^^^^^
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Offline Pawtucket Patriot

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Re: Mash schedules for Lagers
« Reply #21 on: July 02, 2012, 11:12:41 AM »
I have heard of people using melanoidin malt to emulate a decoction mash...anyone tried this with any luck?

I've found melanoidin to add a particular flavor to my lagers, but it's not a flavor that was ever present in any of the decocted beers I've brewed.
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