Author Topic: Ethnic and Regional Cooking  (Read 85073 times)

Offline punatic

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #975 on: January 13, 2011, 11:38:27 AM »
The rice is off white.

He was stuck on her like off-white on rice? 

I don't think so... It doesn't work.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #976 on: January 17, 2011, 05:41:03 AM »
How much (by weight) of masa dough do you typically use for each corn tortilla? I've got 500 g of masa harina and the sister-in-law and her family are coming for dinner next weekend.. Just need to make sure I've got enough.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #977 on: January 17, 2011, 06:23:48 AM »
I just roll out a golf ball size piece of dough and then put it in the tortilla press. It will be the same if you roll it out. You can make really big flour tortillas but the corn is less resilient. Best to keep them small.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #978 on: January 17, 2011, 07:50:13 AM »
I just roll out a golf ball size piece of dough and then put it in the tortilla press. It will be the same if you roll it out. You can make really big flour tortillas but the corn is less resilient. Best to keep them small.

If one does not have a tortilla press (they don't have them even in GERMANY, which is where they usually have everything) can one use a rolling pin and/or an astrophysics textbook?
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #979 on: January 17, 2011, 11:25:41 AM »
Text book I would say no. Cause it will be hard to distribute even pressure.

Rolling pin works great, I meqnt to say that in the last post. The press only offers evenly round tortillas, with a rolling pin they are a little wonky, more rustic.

Try some homemade flour tortillas. they take a little practice but man they are awesome.

Here is the way of making flour tortillas by one of the best Mexican chefs out there. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBgsLmDcL78
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 11:28:48 AM by capozzoli »
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Offline deepsouth

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #980 on: January 17, 2011, 11:32:52 AM »
damn, just caught up on the last three pages.  you guys are off the hook.  i'm going to put my training wheels back on!
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Offline euge

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #981 on: January 17, 2011, 12:02:28 PM »
I just roll out a golf ball size piece of dough and then put it in the tortilla press. It will be the same if you roll it out. You can make really big flour tortillas but the corn is less resilient. Best to keep them small.

If one does not have a tortilla press (they don't have them even in GERMANY, which is where they usually have everything) can one use a rolling pin and/or an astrophysics textbook?

Rolling the dough out between wax paper or plastic wrap might help. Locally we use plastic wrap in the presses to keep the dough from sticking.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #982 on: January 17, 2011, 12:41:37 PM »
Oh yeah, have to use wax papper or wrap.

Here is good instruction on corn tortillas with a rolling pin. From an Indian cook no less.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VToLFw-eH2s
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Offline punatic

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #983 on: January 18, 2011, 11:56:50 AM »
I just roll out a golf ball size piece of dough and then put it in the tortilla press. It will be the same if you roll it out. You can make really big flour tortillas but the corn is less resilient. Best to keep them small.

If one does not have a tortilla press (they don't have them even in GERMANY, which is where they usually have everything) can one use a rolling pin and/or an astrophysics textbook?

I've had luck using my Fluid Mechanics/Hydraulics textbook.  I can control and apply the pressure evenly.
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Offline tubercle

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #984 on: January 21, 2011, 05:06:32 PM »
OK.

  Tubercle has two pint jars of lemons pickled in salt like Cap said. Been curing since mid-November.

Now what? How are they used? I believe cutting off the rinds and using them in soup was mentioned.
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #985 on: January 22, 2011, 12:21:35 PM »
I'm in the midst of a whole lot of indian cooking.  Got some tandoori chicken marinating for the grill, just finished a batch of naan done under the broiler, yesterday I made the pastry and filling for aloo samosas, and premade (but haven't fried) them.  Last weekend I made a (probably referenced) red pepper baigan bharta, which I'll have to warm up for tonight.  Later tonight, frying the samosas, grilling the chicken, and then a batch of boneless chicken pakoras (bits of chicken in a spicy gram batter).  Oh, and I made a batch of dal this morning, which took a few hours...red pepper, masoor dal, and a chicken yakhni broth, lots of onions and spices.  Will reheat tonight.

On top of all that, my brother in law is bringing his specialties, I believe a rice dish, tikka masala, and kheer.

Going to be a ridiculous amount of food.

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #986 on: January 22, 2011, 01:41:48 PM »
Hey tubercle are you sure the lemons are ready? Im not sure cause I have never done it. But I heard it takes a looonnnggg time.

MAybe not, if they are done they are done. They should smell crazy strong and perhaps more like something you would clean the floor with rather than food.

Anyway here is my Recipe for Moroccan Chicken tangine with preserved lemmons.

Take a pot that you can put in the oven.It has to have a lid and be big enough to fit a whole chicken.

Put the pot on the stove and get it hot over med high heat. Put in one whole onion chopped and let the onions brown dry with no oil. Then put in some chopped garlic. When the onions are starting to brown put in some oil. Then add salt, pepper. Then add a sliced green pepper, a sliced zuccinni, a sliced large carrot, a small amount of peas (frozen are great.
Toss and let the veg brown.

Add two sliced up preserved lemons.  Then whole stick of cinnamon or a teaspoon of ground. A teaspoon of cumin seeds, a bay leaf, some fresh chopped mint or dry mint or basil. four or five chopped fresh tomatoes or a pint can of tomato (whole or chopped or puree is fine) Add a teaspoon of honey, a few splashes of red wine. Go easy on the wine. Then add a bunch of green cured olives. Black olives work fine too.

Simmer while you taste and adjust spices.

Then put the chicken in the por breast up and wait for it to come back up to a simmer. Cover and and put it into a 350 degree oven. Let it cook in the oven four two hours or more.

Serve with cous cous made with quinces and raisins. Or just plain cous cous or rice. BAsmati would be awesome.

Seems like a long time for a chicken. But this recipe is very very old. It comes from back when the Moroccan people were nomadic. They cooked the food they had with them in saddle bags so many dishes are cooked for a very long time to ensure that any bacteria is killed.

They had with them, kefir or yogurt, preserved lemons ( a good source of vitamin c) dried meats or partially dried meats.

Let capozzoli know if it has any Q's.

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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #987 on: January 22, 2011, 02:22:45 PM »
I need to make some more preserved lemons.  Last time I used meyer lemons.  Should I do that again or would you recommend normal "eureka" style lemons?

Offline tubercle

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #988 on: January 22, 2011, 03:22:57 PM »
Thanks capozzoli. Most ingredients are on hand and a big cast iron dutch oven is ready for service.

 The lemons still smell lemony so it may wait another month or two to see how they progress.
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Offline euge

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #989 on: January 22, 2011, 04:18:56 PM »
Thanks capozzoli. Most ingredients are on hand and a big cast iron dutch oven is ready for service.

 The lemons still smell lemony so it may wait another month or two to see how they progress.

All the real Indian "pickle" I've ever had smelled like the cleaning products under the sink. So when you smell Comet it's probably ready.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman