Author Topic: Ethnic and Regional Cooking  (Read 102441 times)

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #345 on: April 09, 2010, 05:15:08 PM »
Went to Bells MArket on the way home.

Its a beautiful Russian grocery store. Its wonderful there. You should see the cashiers!  ;)

Didnt make this stuff but got it prepared just had to heat it up.

Klobasa and sauerkraut with blood sausage and mashed.





Cold smoked Sazan fish





I cook with this sometimes but check out what the lable suggests.  :o







Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #346 on: April 09, 2010, 06:43:00 PM »
Alles sieht sehr gut aus!

(thats about as far east as I get language wise)

Just got done racking two batches of beer and bottling a third, and I'm a bit on the hungry side, so that spread looks particularly nice...as it stands I'm thawing a frozen bag of homemade pastrami.  Need to suss out a side from my limited pantry...

Offline beerocd

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #347 on: April 09, 2010, 09:36:02 PM »
C'mon! Lard, garlic, bread and a hot pan.(+pinch of salt) Now there's a meal! (ok, a really tasty snack)
Look which city it comes from.  ;)



« Last Edit: April 10, 2010, 06:35:03 AM by beerocd »
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #348 on: April 10, 2010, 06:36:59 AM »
All the good meat stuffs comes from Chicago. Ever read The Jungle by Upton Sinclair?

I should have posted a pick of the "high fat" sour cream that I got too. Man that stuff is good. Have to make a batch of perogies.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #349 on: April 10, 2010, 11:30:25 AM »
You need a bottle of this with that meal.

Ron Price

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #350 on: April 10, 2010, 02:17:52 PM »
I really, really love Russian food. It is hard to go through that Groceryt store witout drooling on the floor. The smoked meat section is to die for. Has to be 200 different kinds of smoked klobasa hanging there. Get past that and you are in the cold smoked fish department. OMG.. I wish I had my camera with me.

I have to get a jack so I can upload pics from my phone or something.

Here is another interesting dish. These little sandwiches of  thin sliced cold smoked pork bellies are popular all over Eastern Europe. Served on a wedge of rye bread topped with things like, sliced scallions, horse radish and mustard.

They go great with beer, and are said to go with drinking too as the fat somehow prevents a hangover.




I cant remember how to say it in Slovakian but they are called "little soldiers". there. 

Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline The Professor

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #351 on: April 10, 2010, 04:50:45 PM »
C'mon! Lard, garlic, bread and a hot pan.(+pinch of salt) Now there's a meal! (ok, a really tasty snack)


+1
The Eastern European po'folks sure knew how to eat.

I still remember my grandma (Hungarian) skewering a big hunk of pork belly (szolona)  on  a stick:   she'd deeply score the non skin side in a crosshatch pattern and slowly and patiently spin it over a wood fire (being careful not to let it burn), and as the pork belly heated up catching the drippings on rye bread (which was covered with sliced onions, peppers, and radishes).
After it was spent, the crosshatched cubes of rendered fat were cut off and lightly salted for a hearty sandwich (with more of the vegetables).

Peasant food at it's best.  I still enjoy this treat once in a while...tasty  and satisfying Hungarian soul food...  and healthy too if you don't eat it every day.
AL
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #352 on: April 11, 2010, 02:35:56 PM »
My wife says she remembers doing this when they were kids in Slovakia. Said it is the equivalent of roasted marshmallows or wienies on a stick in this country. They would do it a lot on picnics.

BTW it is called Slanina in CZ/Slovakia.
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Offline beerocd

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #353 on: April 11, 2010, 08:15:12 PM »
"Chasing the drippings" would be the translation to english. It's really fun to do off a whole pig on a spit.
Your hand gets all super hot over the coals, while you're trying to catch some drippings holding onto a piece of bread under the pig. Good times!

It's slanine in Serbian. The slavic languages are very similar. You say klobasa I say kobasica.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2010, 08:17:35 PM by beerocd »
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #354 on: April 13, 2010, 05:23:06 PM »
English pub fare tonight.

Used some of that lard.


Steak and Kidney pie.






Beer, its whats for dinner.

http://theholyravioli.blogspot.com/

http:// www.thecapo.us

Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #355 on: April 13, 2010, 05:33:45 PM »
Your makin' me hungry again dude.  ;D
Ron Price

Offline The Professor

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #356 on: April 13, 2010, 09:06:17 PM »
English pub fare tonight.

Used some of that lard.
Steak and Kidney pie.....

A thing of beauty.  LOVE steak and kidney pie...I hate it when places dumb it down to be "steak and mushroom" pie.

I learned growing up that offal is not awful.
AL
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #357 on: April 14, 2010, 09:41:05 AM »
English pub fare tonight.

Used some of that lard.
Steak and Kidney pie.....

A thing of beauty.  LOVE steak and kidney pie...I hate it when places dumb it down to be "steak and mushroom" pie.

I learned growing up that offal is not awful.


Guts are yummy, if well prepared., but they are easy to screw up as well.  Unfortunately, due to the high amount of cholesterol in them, I don't eat them very often.  One of my old faves was pork kidneys sauteded with hot frying peppers.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #358 on: April 14, 2010, 03:17:52 PM »
The guy that taught me how to make this pie was funny.

He told me "The first step in making good steak and kidney pie is to take your kidneys, put them on a cutting board. Then go over to the trash can tilt the cutting board to a 45 degree angle and scrape the kidneys into the trash. They taste like piss."

I use one small kidney in this dish, I soak it over night in salt water and wine. Then I chop it into small pieces. I use much more steak than kidneys. They are strong in flavor and a little is OK. To much and it gets a little nasty.

Its good to just leave the kidneys out all together. I also add the carrots peas and potaoes to the inside of the pie instead of serving them alongside.

Didnt patriot make this dish? I wanted to compare but could find his. .

Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline Pawtucket Patriot

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #359 on: April 14, 2010, 03:59:10 PM »
Didnt patriot make this dish? I wanted to compare but could find his. .



I made steak and Guinness pie, which is pretty similar.  Yours looks delicious!

Photos here: http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=1316.0

Recipe here: http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/beef-recipes/steak-guinness-and-cheese-pie-with-a-puf
Matt Schwandt | Minneapolis, MN
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