Author Topic: Ethnic and Regional Cooking  (Read 85132 times)

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #780 on: September 28, 2010, 03:32:01 PM »
I don't know if Gritty's has the best lobster roll in ME, but never really liked lobster rolls anyway.  Whole lobster for me.  Whole Dungeness too.  Steamed either way.  So good.
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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #781 on: September 28, 2010, 03:38:39 PM »
Best crab I ever had was just a bunch of Dungeness piled on a bun, somewhere on the Oregon coast.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #782 on: September 28, 2010, 03:44:41 PM »
Ill take Maine lobster!!

Never had a lobster roll.

I like king crab legs better than Dungenss. Hey, how did those crabs get that name anyway?

Have to say my favorite seafood dish is a broiled seafood combo. Lobster, shrimp, scallops, clams, mussels and flounder. Some corn on the cob, baked potato. the suff od dreams.

Second favorite would be a chippino fra diavalo.
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #783 on: September 28, 2010, 05:22:37 PM »
I live in KC...our seafood scene is, well....never mind.

I did snag a 10lb box of pollack for 1.89 a lb.  Scoff at the cheap fish, you may, but I take what I can get and thats an insanely good price around here.  Nice for pan-frying.

This Friday I am planning to go to a nice little sushi place.  Some nigorizake, tempura, and lots of sashimi.


Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #784 on: September 28, 2010, 06:01:46 PM »
Quote
I have a couple of blue fish that were caught by a friend up in Cape Cod. gonna smoke them for sure.

If you do, save some and make smoked bluefish pate.  They make that at Legal Seafoods and it's wonderful.  I can dig out the recipe if you need it; it's in their cookbook.

Quote
Here's a question - Maine lobster, or Dungeness crab?  I honestly can't decide which I prefer, both are so good fresh.

Damn, that's hard.  I used to get Maine lobster every year on vacation at Cape Code growing up.  Love the lobster rolls too.  Dungeness crab is probably my favorite, though.  I took one trip to the PNW for a week with the wife and think we had crab or salmon for every meal.  Best Dungeness I ever had was at Scott's Seafood Grill in San Francisco, though.  Whole crab, served cold, with mayo on the side.  Some warm sourdough bread.  Yum.  Their seafood saute is great too.  Those big Dungeness knuckles sauteed whole with other seafood in a beurre blanc.  Decandent.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #785 on: September 28, 2010, 06:19:47 PM »
I have to agree with Gordon...Maine Lobster or Dungeness Crab is a toss up.  :-\

Here's one of my favorites.

Bouillabaisse - a traditional Provencal fish stew originating from the port city of Marseille.
It's a fish soup containing various kinds of cooked fish and shellfish and vegetables, flavored with a variety of herbs and spices such as garlic, orange peel, basil, bay leaf, fennel and saffron.
There are at least three kinds of fish in a traditional bouillabaisse, typically scorpionfish, sea robin and European conger and it can also include gilt-head bream turbot, monkfish, mullet or silver hake. It also usually includes shellfish and other seafood such as sea urchins, mussels, velvet crabs, spider crab or octopus. More expensive versions may add langoustine. Vegetables such as leeks, onions, tomatoes, celery and potatoes are simmered together with the broth and served with the fish. The broth is traditionally served with a rouille, a mayonnaise made of olive oil, garlic, saffron and cayenne pepper on grilled slices of bread.

I like it with a rich fish stock containing a spicy and herbal quality.  I had it most recently in New Orleans. I prefer it with alot of shellfish like crab, mussels, and clams. The rich stock raises this dish up to levels beyond savory. This dish has a thousand variations but is best served on three plates. One with the fish stock, the second with the assortment of sea creatures and the third with hearty bread.




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Offline euge

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #786 on: September 28, 2010, 10:10:33 PM »
Again with the making me hungry. How about Bouillabaisse's poor cousin Cioppino?

I had it in Santa Barbara down at the wharf. Thinking about a trip to NO just to hit some restaurants. Where did you find the Bouillabaisse there bluesman?
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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #787 on: September 28, 2010, 10:41:24 PM »
I can't hear 'bouillabaisse' without thinking of the movie "Our Man Flint" (a Bond spoof starring James Coburn). He goes around tasting every bouillabaisse in Marseille trying to match what someone ate who used a poisoned dart.  It's amusing to watch him take one taste and start rattling off the recipe. 
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Offline euge

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #788 on: September 28, 2010, 11:00:36 PM »
That movie had some influence on Austin Powers I think. It plays all the time. Haven't finished watching it tho.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline narvin

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #789 on: September 29, 2010, 07:51:43 AM »


We steamed some 2.5 pound lobsters up in Cape Cod this summer.  Delicious.  I'll still take blue crab as my favorite, though  :-X
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #790 on: September 29, 2010, 09:05:42 AM »
[img width=640 height=383]http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs157.ash2

We steamed some 2.5 pound lobsters up in Cape Cod this summer.  Delicious.  I'll still take blue crab as my favorite, though  :-X
We got a bushel of blue crab when we were in NC this past summer, it was awesome!  But it's still no Dungeness.

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #791 on: September 29, 2010, 09:26:38 AM »
I'll still take blue crab as my favorite, though  :-X

Blue crabs are my favorite shellfish.  The flavor is second to none IMO.
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #792 on: September 29, 2010, 10:17:52 AM »
I'll eat most seafood, if it's done right.  We have a house bouillabaisse recipe that is out of this world.  My wife makes the stock and I'm not sure what all goes into it except clams, mussels, rockfish or some other firm white fleshed fish, scallops, andouille, tomatoes, garlic, onion.  The broth is very rich.  I don't know what herbs and spices she uses, but I must say I can eat the crap out of that stuff.  Especially with some crispy homemade bread.
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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #793 on: September 29, 2010, 01:14:44 PM »
I can't hear 'bouillabaisse' without thinking of the movie "Our Man Flint" (a Bond spoof starring James Coburn). He goes around tasting every bouillabaisse in Marseille trying to match what someone ate who used a poisoned dart.  It's amusing to watch him take one taste and start rattling off the recipe. 
I think that one was "In Like Flint"
I love the bouillabaisse scene.  As soon as he tastes the right batch he eyes the room for the bad guys.

I've been perfecting shrimp and grits over the last year.  Maple-wood smoked bacon is the key, with red, yellow and poblano peppers for flavor and color before sautéing the shrimp.  Creamy cheese grits make it divine.

I make some darned good mussels, too.  Chorizo, garlic, shallots and whatever homebrewed Belgian beer I happen to have on tap.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #794 on: September 29, 2010, 02:58:56 PM »
I make some darned good mussels, too.  Chorizo, garlic, shallots and whatever homebrewed Belgian beer I happen to have on tap.
No offense Jeff, but how could you make anything bad with those ingredients? :)
Tom Schmidlin