Author Topic: Ethnic and Regional Cooking  (Read 85118 times)

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #840 on: October 21, 2010, 07:07:34 PM »
Tom ...I knew I could count on you to keep me straight.  Thanks.  ;)
Someone has to, right? :)
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #841 on: October 22, 2010, 04:46:40 AM »
Kosher? that is strange.

I didnt think you cared that much about kosher being the slutty shikza you are, nic.
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #842 on: October 22, 2010, 08:03:41 PM »
I would reply with some humorous banter but my comic yiddish is woefully inadequate.

I gather that the Zwack company may be run by Jews?  Read it somewhere.  Although I cringe from even writing "run by Jews" as it makes me sound like I'm about to quote from the Protocols of the Elders of Zion and go all apes*** crazy but I just mean it in a literal, precise sense that it may be a somewhat Jewish company...at least by my vague recollection.  I care not a whit as pork products are not particularly necessary for me in alcoholic beverages.  My smoked weizenbeer may have smelled like a bacon beer but it was only an olfactory hallucination.

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #843 on: October 24, 2010, 04:26:13 PM »
Interesting History. Nothing about them being Jewish though.

From Wiki.

Unicum was created by Dr. József Zwack, the Royal Physician to the Habsburg Court, for Emperor Joseph II in 1790. It was not until 1840 that his 20-year-old son, Jozsef Zwack founded J. Zwack & Co., the first Hungarian liqueur manufacturer. By the early 1900s, the Zwack company had become one of the leading distilleries in central Europe, producing over 200 liqueurs and spirits, exported all over the world.

In 1915, Jozsef’s son, Lajos, took over the factory and left it to his two sons, Bela and Janos, upon his death. During World War II, Budapest and the Zwack factory were completely destroyed. After the war, with the Communist regime, the factory was nationalized in 1948. The Zwack family fled the country. Janos Zwack with his son Peter, great grandson of József, was able to escape with the original Zwack recipe in his pocket. Bela Zwack remained behind to give the communist government a “fake” Zwack recipe and went on to become a regular factory worker.

Meanwhile, Janos and Peter migrated to the United States and after several months in Ellis Island’s refugee camp were granted US entry purely because they possessed the Zwack recipe. They later settled in the Bronx in 1949 when Peter was 22 years old. It was in the US that Peter learned all the ins and outs of the spirits industry.

In 1988, just one year before the fall of Communism, Peter Zwack returned to Hungary and resumed production with the original Zwack formula. He repurchased his family business from the State in the summer of 1989, and by the spring of 1990, the original Zwack product was reintroduced to the Hungarian market. That same year, Peter was named Hungarian Ambassador to the United States[2].

The Zwack Company has since resumed its position as the leading distillery in eastern Europe. In 2008, Peter Zwack handed over the company’s leadership to the family’s 6th generation, his own children, Sandor and Izabella Zwack, to continue the family tradition. One of their first initiatives was to launch Zwack in the US, a landmark in the history of the company and for any internationally revered brand.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zwack_liqueur

Here is how you will find the label in Europe.





For no real reason it seems that Zwack and Becherovka are Christmas things around our house.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2010, 04:30:46 PM by capozzoli »
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #844 on: October 24, 2010, 04:53:01 PM »
Just uncapped a bottle, and wow!  The first thing I thought was, hmm...some parallels to other kosher alcohols (manishewitz!) because this smelled like Welch's concord grape juice!  Extremely fruit forward and sweet smelling.  I thought I had a grape juice liqueur on my hands but thankfully the sweetness abates in the taste.  I don't know that its my favorite slivovitz by any stretch, but it sure is interesting.  And with substantial kick, too.  Probably not a Jewish company then, I don't recall where I read that.

Got some kajmak, ajvar, and suva govedja today. 

Offline Pawtucket Patriot

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #845 on: October 30, 2010, 05:16:04 PM »
Not sure if this should really go in this thread, because I think pot pie is pretty ubiquitous (and, thus, not necessarily "regional").  But, we made some really good chicken pot pie tonight with a biscuit crust.

Matt Schwandt | Minneapolis, MN
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #846 on: October 31, 2010, 05:50:25 PM »
Man those look good. May have to give it a try.My wife does not really like pot pie, but she does like biscuits.

Ethiopian tonight.

I fermented my injera batter for a week. Seemed to work out well still not a fluffy and resilient as I would like them to be.



Clockwise from left to right starting at 9:00 :

Yesiga t'ibs

ye'atakilt alich'a

ye'abesha gomen

yemisir kik we't
Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline euge

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #847 on: October 31, 2010, 05:56:03 PM »
Beef, chicken, greens then beans? Looks tasty!
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #848 on: October 31, 2010, 06:19:26 PM »
Very nice work gents. Makin' me hungry.  8)
Ron Price

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #849 on: November 03, 2010, 05:35:54 PM »
Tajikistan



Pumpkin stuffed with rice onions, quinces and almonds served on top of meat sauce and kefir.

Beer, its whats for dinner.

http://theholyravioli.blogspot.com/

http:// www.thecapo.us

Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #850 on: November 03, 2010, 06:05:48 PM »
I see your putting those kefir grains to good use.  Looks tasty.  I like the pumpkin twist.
It's rapidly approaching Pho time.  By the time I get up your way to do some more brewstand welding  8)
...which will be sooner than later I hope
we need to go for some Pho.  Unless of course, you have something else in mind.
Ron Price

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #851 on: November 03, 2010, 06:14:13 PM »
Thang Long Pho works for me, haven't been there in a while.
Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #852 on: November 04, 2010, 12:28:03 AM »
Tajikistan

Pumpkin stuffed with rice onions, quinces and almonds served on top of meat sauce and kefir.
What's the thing to the right of the plate?  :)

Thang Long Pho works for me, haven't been there in a while.
Try Pho King.  It's excellent.  :)
Tom Schmidlin

Offline euge

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #853 on: November 04, 2010, 12:36:14 AM »
Is Pho King a chain? BTW the pho soft tendon and bible tripe with rare beef is probably my favorite combo. But just give me the tendon and I'm good. It's getting colder. Noodle soup.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #854 on: November 04, 2010, 08:53:58 AM »
Is Pho King a chain?
I don't know, there's a few in this area so a small chain at least.  I don't know if they exist in other areas, but you can't beat the name.  ;D
Tom Schmidlin