Author Topic: Ethnic and Regional Cooking  (Read 102787 times)

Offline ryang

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #855 on: November 04, 2010, 09:26:36 AM »

Online narvin

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #856 on: November 04, 2010, 09:29:29 AM »
Thang Long Pho works for me, haven't been there in a while.
Try Pho King.  It's excellent.  :)

The result of Pho King is often unicum...
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #857 on: November 04, 2010, 09:53:01 AM »
Pho (pronounced "phir" in English) is influenced by the Chinese and French cuisines, and was believed to have originally derived from a French soup, "pot au feu",(pot on fire) which Wikipedia defines as a French beef stew. This is usually a mixture of cuts of beef, vegetable, and spice.

I love this dish on a cold winter day.

Here's the basic ingredients.



And to the bowl... ;)



photos taken from the web.
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Offline euge

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #858 on: November 04, 2010, 10:44:51 AM »
That's it! Don't have time today but tomorrow- oh tomorrow. And I'll drive the extra miles to Pho Cong Ly. We do the basil-cilantro-bean sprout here but mint sounds nice. I might have even had it though my memory escapes me.

And a half order of fried spring-rolls.

Here's an example off the web. I actually judge a Vietnamese place by how they handle and prepare their spring-rolls not their pho. If they get that wrong (many do incidentally) odds are their pho is substandard too.

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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #859 on: November 04, 2010, 12:10:48 PM »
Pho (pronounced "phir" in English) is influenced by the Chinese and French cuisines, and was believed to have originally derived from a French soup, "pot au feu",(pot on fire) which Wikipedia defines as a French beef stew. This is usually a mixture of cuts of beef, vegetable, and spice.

I love this dish on a cold winter day.

Here's the basic ingredients.



And to the bowl... ;)



photos taken from the web.

nice...

No Phoking around here. But we call Thang Long, Long Thang

Pho King. Thats great. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgX2q9WPoqo
« Last Edit: November 04, 2010, 12:48:02 PM by capozzoli »
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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #860 on: November 04, 2010, 08:53:58 PM »
Phir?  Always sounded like "fuh" to me.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #861 on: November 05, 2010, 12:19:14 AM »
Phir?  Always sounded like "fuh" to me.
I used to work with a Vietnamese woman.  She definitely pronounced it "fuh".  How is "phir" different from "fur" anyway?   ;D
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #862 on: November 07, 2010, 03:06:07 PM »
Ghanna for lunch today.

Groundnut stew with a chicken thigh and egg. Served with a fu fu of cassava root and cornmeal.



I was looking all over for ground nut paste, couldnt find it. Finally went to a Senegalese store in West Philly. Walked in and the guy looked at me like I was crazy, I almost asked, what? Then he looked at me like I was even crazier when I asked him for some ground nut paste. He chuckled and went to the shelf to get a jar of peanut butter.  ::) Yep, Africans call peanuts groundnuts. Makes sense I guess.

Anyway, nice creamy spicey sauce, goes well with the fu fu. If you ever try to make this stew use real peanut butter , not skippy or something like that. I get the fresh ground stuff from Trader Joes.  

« Last Edit: November 07, 2010, 03:49:31 PM by capozzoli »
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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #863 on: November 07, 2010, 03:53:05 PM »
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #864 on: November 07, 2010, 06:03:10 PM »
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?

I don't know...but if I went to a vietnemese restaurant and asked for some Pho Que
they would probably look at me funny...and give me the finger.  ;D
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Offline euge

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #865 on: November 07, 2010, 06:28:21 PM »
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?

LMAO!
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Offline punatic

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #866 on: November 07, 2010, 07:06:09 PM »
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?

It's a slow cook process - pho que long time...

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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #867 on: November 08, 2010, 02:57:54 AM »
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?

It's a slow cook process - pho que long time...



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Offline punatic

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #868 on: November 08, 2010, 06:46:34 AM »
I hear pho que is very popular with the Fugowee indians.

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #869 on: November 08, 2010, 07:52:47 AM »
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?
It's a slow cook process - pho que long time...

I thought that was love you long time...or is that the translation.

Ramen Noodles is a noodle soup that was originally imported to Japan from China in the Meiji Period. The Japanese adopted this dish in the 19th century and started calling it as Ramen. Ramen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese (la mian), which mean hand-pulled noodles.

After World War II, cheap flour imported from the U.S. swept the Japanese market and an intense food shortage in Japan, Ramen was became a popular food after World War II in Japan. Eventually, Ramen was voted the country’s national dish.



Have you ever had Shoyu Ramen-Shoyu Ramen is noodles in soy sauce flavored soup. Shoyu Ramen has typically a brown and clear color broth, based on a chicken/vegetable/fish/beef stock with plenty of soy sauce.



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