Author Topic: Ethnic and Regional Cooking  (Read 102806 times)

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #885 on: November 17, 2010, 02:31:35 PM »
The ones I have are a little different. They are all cubed up, brown in color and kinda dry. I think this is the way they do them in most of central Aisa.  Ill post a pic when I get home. The Cambodians (I think) do it the same as Moroccans but they use limes.
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Offline tubercle

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #886 on: November 17, 2010, 06:09:48 PM »
Jar - check
Salt - check
Lemons -  :(

Stop by the grocery on the way home tomorrow - check
Sweet Caroline where the Sun rises over the deep blue sea and sets somewhere beyond Tennessee

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #887 on: November 17, 2010, 08:03:15 PM »
Oh yeah, after your pickles are done in about six months you have to make some Moroccan food.Its fantastic.

You have to make that famous Moroccan whole chicken dish. Cant remember what it is called. Ya need those lemons and good cured green olives though. I have a great recipe for it. My Chicken Caccitore is kinda the same. 

Gotta get some real couscous. Dont by the stuff at the grocery store.

Hey tubercle, maybe you will want to make your own couscous?

http://www.starchefs.com/events/studio/techniques/MLahlou/index.shtml

Here is another good method for doing the lemons.

http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_make_preserved_lemons/

Here are the North Indian ones. I get these at a deli counter at the Indian grocery store.



Asked them today, they said the only ingredients are, lemons, salt, fenugreek, chili powder, bay leaf. They are first pickled in a brine the same as the Moroccan, But that they later remove them and dry them after the stuff looses a lot of moisture it is packed into crocks and then aged a little longer.

These are not spicy at all though, I think it is just paprika they are talking about not hot chili powder as we know it.

I think that is where the word "preserved" comes from, instead of calling it pickled or fermented. Because there are further poducts you can make after the lemons have been preserved. This is what the Indians make lemon and lime pickles with. They dro the same preservation method then they take those lemons and pack them into jars with all kinds of spices and stuff. Garlic.

If you have ever had Indian pickles you know they are not for everyone,also a bit of an acquired taste. The flavor i s explosive. First time I had them I hated them, now I love them.





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Offline beerocd

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #888 on: November 17, 2010, 08:23:55 PM »
Here are the North Indian ones. I get these at a deli DELHI counter at the Indian grocery store.

can't help it sometimes...

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Offline euge

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #889 on: November 17, 2010, 08:35:17 PM »
First time I had Indian "pickle" I could have sworn it was made by mixing up limes, mangos and comet with a dash of drano. 

Chutney on the other hand is to die for.
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Offline punatic

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #890 on: November 17, 2010, 08:38:17 PM »

Here are the North Indian ones. I get these at a deli counter at the Indian grocery store.



Hey!  I saw some of those on the trail today while I was out horseback riding!
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #891 on: November 18, 2010, 02:40:54 PM »
Who has a great saag recipe?  I love saag paneer but can do without the paneer, myself (the wife dislikes the texture) so I'm wanting a nice blended spinach curry.  Maybe going to make some this weekend along with some thawed out dal and naan and basmati.  I have some frozen micro-scallops and have a recipe for Indian chili scallops, but my wife wasn't any too keen on the idea.  Last time I used these scallops it almost ruined a pasta dish. 

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #892 on: November 18, 2010, 02:45:40 PM »
Who has a great saag recipe?  I love saag paneer but can do without the paneer, myself (the wife dislikes the texture) so I'm wanting a nice blended spinach curry.  Maybe going to make some this weekend along with some thawed out dal and naan and basmati.  I have some frozen micro-scallops and have a recipe for Indian chili scallops, but my wife wasn't any too keen on the idea.  Last time I used these scallops it almost ruined a pasta dish. 

Not a saag recipe per se but I am working on an appetizer of paneer dusted with saag spices, wrapped in spinach or similar leaves and tempura fried. It's okay at this point but I still have to work on the spice level. I ussually use cumin, coriander, chili flakes a little tumaric for color and that's about it. maybe some black pepper. Whole spices, heat the oil (or ghee) up till shimmery, add the spices (Put a lid on and turn the vent fan to high) move the pan till the spices start to pop and then add the spinach and cream.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #893 on: November 18, 2010, 02:50:45 PM »
Hey Nic, we make a lot of saag. Mostly Saag aloo.

You can put just about anything in there, other veg. Shrimp, chicken.

Ill post my recipe a little later. Vah Reh Vah has a good one. It is simpler than mine.
Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline jeffy

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #894 on: November 18, 2010, 03:03:30 PM »
Hey Nic, we make a lot of saag. Mostly Saag aloo.

You can put just about anything in there, other veg. Shrimp, chicken.

Ill post my recipe a little later. Vah Reh Vah has a good one. It is simpler than mine.

I like saag ghost but have never ever considered making it.  Looking forward to your recipe.
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #895 on: November 18, 2010, 03:46:07 PM »

I like saag ghost but have never ever considered making it.  Looking forward to your recipe.

You mean saag gosht?  Gosht meaning meat (usually lamb or goat, depending whether in India or the west).  I think I have a recipe for that too, but I wasn't planning on a meat dish.

I think I'm just going to stick simple...chilies, garlic, ginger, fried onions, and an eyeballed mix of spices (cumin, fenugreek, coriander, black mustard seeds, etc.).  A bit of heavy cream in it though would be lovely!  I usually end up making the pureed things like this (and the dal) very very spicy and use them more as dips for bread.  My dal is too seasoned to reasonably just eat a bowl of it.  Though I have tried.  And suffered the consequences....

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #896 on: November 18, 2010, 07:46:24 PM »
For my saag I only use fresh spinach. YOu can use frozen but it changes the final consistancey. I n a food processor I put a small onion, a few cloves of garlic, a finger of ginger skin on, then I puree it.

Then I heat up some ghee or oil in a sauce pan big enough to receive the raw spinach leaves. When the oil is med hot I add a healthy pinch of cumin seeds, another of mustard seeds, and another of fenugreek.. salt and pepper

When the seeds start to crackle and release their essential oils then pour in the puree onion mixture,stir it constantly until it browns a little.

Then throw in the spinach whole, or you can chop it a little. Add more oil or ghee if it is needed.

Put it on low and let it simmer for a half hour. Check it frequently. The leaves should release moisture to simme for that long. If not just add a little water at a time so it can cook till it is tender.

After about a half hour the leaves are soft but still have some body to them, thats how I like it. Some people like it the consistency of a thick sauce. If you want it that way just simmer for another half hour or more. It will turn to mush. I mean a silky creamy consistence.
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Offline euge

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #897 on: November 18, 2010, 11:36:23 PM »
Quick switch-up. ;)

If anything is ethnic or regional then this has to be it.



Got this today at a Hawaiian place down the road. They greeted me with a smile and said Aloha!

So I ordered me two spam musubi to go. They were served warm wrapped in foil. There's what appears to be furikake in there. Not sure what that is but it tastes good. The spam was grilled but didn't appear to be sauced.

Found I can't take a huge bite or it ruptures out the other end- so careful bites. I was surprised to actually hear myself emitting little moans of pleasure as I ate the things. These are so good. The nori, rice and the seasoning have a very forward flavor with the spam coming through lightly in the finish...

I have all the ingredients except the furikake and finding that should be easy.

Thanks punatic I would never realized these existed!

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Offline punatic

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #898 on: November 18, 2010, 11:55:42 PM »
You are welcome!  It is pretty amazing that spam can taste so good.  Here on Hawaii Island we don't usually put furikake on our spam musubi, but I'm definetly going to try it that way.  Good idea!  It is often served with scrambled egg wrapped inside with the spam.

Musubi are sold everywhere here, including 7-11.  A buck a roll is the going price.  Cheap, easy to carry, and definetly hits the spot!  Hawaiian kine grinds to da max...
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Offline tubercle

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #899 on: November 19, 2010, 10:10:43 AM »
Jar - check
Salt - check
Lemons -  :(

Stop by the grocery on the way home tomorrow - check

 Sliced, salted & in the jar. ;D
Sweet Caroline where the Sun rises over the deep blue sea and sets somewhere beyond Tennessee