Author Topic: Ethnic and Regional Cooking  (Read 101530 times)

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #930 on: November 25, 2010, 06:26:29 PM »
I love Philly Jazz. I was a bartender at Ortliebs Jazzhaus for about 8 years. What a blast.

Here is some Video shot at Ortliebs, what great memories. And I mean GREAT!. Great place for ethnic food too!!!



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKrWZnAz5ng

RIP Sid Simmons.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPEZCR0VtVY



Not just one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time but a dear friend. I will miss him. Its crazy, Im not THAT old but I am starting to realize that the older you get the more friends and loved ones you loose. I have a tear in my eye watching these videos. Especially the one with Sid looking thin and week.

Be thankful for what you have and enjoy every min with the people you love, this is what is important. Nothing else.

« Last Edit: November 25, 2010, 08:11:57 PM by capozzoli »
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #931 on: November 25, 2010, 09:06:31 PM »
A truly remarkable jazz rythym section and one that really developed over time like a fine beer or wine.

A great influence for myself as a bass player who can really relate to the chemistry that existed on that stage.

One of Phillies greatest Jazz trios to grace the stage.  8)

Thanks Cap!

What kind of ethnic food did Ortiebs serve?
« Last Edit: November 25, 2010, 09:08:04 PM by bluesman »
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #932 on: November 25, 2010, 09:28:40 PM »
Well, first off there is the "Old" Ortliebs. Where I first started working as a cook, (Later became a bartender and manager) Back then they served "soul food with a creole flare". 10 taps of great beer. Not sure what the new Ortliebs is serving may be the same. I heard the food is pretty good. I havent been there in several years. Mickey Roker still plays there and Bootsie Barnes. The place is a treasure, its a little place and you can see world famous jazz musicians, even meet them. I loved that place even before I worked there.  

Im reading now that Ortliebs closed its doors in April of this year. I havent been by it in a while. If it really stayed closed I am shocked. What a loss. Their website is still up though.

Oh man, its gone, I just tried to call there, phone disconnected. I am bummed. It is like part of me has died.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2010, 10:21:11 PM by capozzoli »
Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #933 on: November 26, 2010, 09:48:33 AM »
Well, first off there is the "Old" Ortliebs. Where I first started working as a cook, (Later became a bartender and manager) Back then they served "soul food with a creole flare". 10 taps of great beer. Not sure what the new Ortliebs is serving may be the same. I heard the food is pretty good. I havent been there in several years. Mickey Roker still plays there and Bootsie Barnes. The place is a treasure, its a little place and you can see world famous jazz musicians, even meet them. I loved that place even before I worked there.  

Im reading now that Ortliebs closed its doors in April of this year. I havent been by it in a while. If it really stayed closed I am shocked. What a loss. Their website is still up though.

Oh man, its gone, I just tried to call there, phone disconnected. I am bummed. It is like part of me has died.

This is too bad.  :(
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #934 on: November 28, 2010, 07:00:39 PM »
Goan Cooking.

Whats was interesting tonight; we had steamed green fresh chick peas. Very good.If I had to describe them I would place them somewhere between edamame and boiled peanuts.Which are two of my favorite snacks. These are going on the top of my snack list too.



Also made the Goan classic pork vindaloo. A nice raita of cucumbers, carrot, onion, cilantro  and a dash of coconut milk. I used heavy kefir instead of yogurt. (Most likely not authentic but worked just the same). Im not sure if Indians use kefir.

Another treat with the meal tonight was the Coconut podi. It is a batter of rice flour and yeast left to ferment a few days.I started it on Thur..Then tonight thinned it out with coconut milk before putting it to the pan.



Pork vindaloo is one of my very favorite dishes. It is wonderfully sweet and sour and spicy. If anyone want the recipe for the vindaloo just let me know and Ill type it out. Settling in to watch The Walking Dead now.  ;D


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Offline beerocd

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #935 on: November 28, 2010, 07:04:42 PM »
depends, how complicated it is...

Looks great - I'd eat it, not sure I'd cook it. You get a little more involved with your dishes than I care to...
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #936 on: November 28, 2010, 07:17:43 PM »
Very nice looking dish Cap. This is a new one to me but I think I would like it.
Looks like a comfort food type dish...well rounded.  8)
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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #937 on: November 28, 2010, 07:32:48 PM »
Whats was interesting tonight; we had steamed green fresh chick peas. Very good.If I had to describe them I would place them somewhere between edamame and boiled peanuts.Which are two of my favorite snacks. These are going on the top of my snack list too.

Also made the Goan classic pork vindaloo. A nice raita of cucumbers, carrot, onion, cilantro  and a dash of coconut milk. I used heavy kefir instead of yogurt. (Most likely not authentic but worked just the same). Im not sure if Indians use kefir.

Another treat with the meal tonight was the Coconut podi. It is a batter of rice flour and yeast left to ferment a few days.I started it on Thur..Then tonight thinned it out with coconut milk before putting it to the pan.


Amazing turkey leftover ideas Cap!  Yum!   :D
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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #938 on: November 28, 2010, 07:46:00 PM »
Vindaloo is one of my favorites too, Capp. I'd like to see your recipe to compare (I can post mine if you'd like).  Yours looks mighty tasty!
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #939 on: November 28, 2010, 09:29:00 PM »
Oh yeah,I would love to see your recipe. I use my accidental homemade beer vinegar. ;)

The pork is great, a hunter frriend just brought it back from a hunting trip in GA.

First, heat pot over med heat, brown a small chopped onion dry.

After they start to get a little dark add  whole seed masala of kalongi, black mustard seed, fenugreek black pepper,bay leaf,a little gee or cooking oil. When the seeds start to crackle,get all toasty and release their yummy essential oils. Add the cubed pork and stir. Then add a small amount of chopped fresh garlic,and about three fresh curry leaves.Then add some chopped fresh tomatoes,green chilies (to taste). Add a small amount of turmeric, a cinnamon stick or a pinch of cinnamon, a healthy amount o fpaprika.Stir again,

At this time add sea salt (I like to use sea salt in Indian cooking cause basically Gandhi dealt the final blow to the English by making salt from the sea)

Then add malt vinegar and jaggery. to taste. or Reg vinegar and brown sugar.

Simmer till the meat is tender.

Im sorry I am not good at communicating amounts of ingredients. Depends on how much one is going to make; I dont measure, plus I would never tell another chef how much of an ingredient to use.

My father always calls me with cooking questions and just does not understand this. Or he will ask how long to cook something, I always tell him to cook it till it is done. He thinks I am f-ing with him.  ::)
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #940 on: November 29, 2010, 06:34:07 AM »
Coconut podi?  I've heard "podi" used to mean powders, as in powdered spices and such (jeera podi, etc).  You mean the bread, right?  I'm trying to think of a similar word...there's roti, and puri...one of them, or some new bread I haven't heard about?

Been a while since I've made vindaloo.  I find it funny the misconceptions about the dish...all the Indian places around here serve it with potatoes!!!!  Just because "aloo" means potatoes.  The etymology comes from vin d'alho or something like that....something to do with wine (vinegar) and garlic.  A very portuguese dish, with a Goan kick to it!

I've just been making naan recipes, recently, I need to get back to trying other pan-fried brieds, like chapati and roti again.

Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #941 on: November 29, 2010, 06:52:28 AM »

I've just been making naan recipes, recently, I need to get back to trying other pan-fried brieds, like chapati and roti again.


Me too. I want to get back into making Roti this year.  I was making it for a while last year but got away from it.
It's great hot off the griddle.
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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #942 on: November 29, 2010, 01:58:49 PM »
OOps, Thanks nic.

The pancakes are called Palappam. or Vellappam. They are made with Ari podi. 

Just goes to show you that I can not read Hindi.  ::)

Now if you will excuse me I have to use the podi.
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Offline punatic

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #943 on: November 29, 2010, 02:21:45 PM »
Now if you will excuse me I have to use the podi.

A-Hah!  I suspected you to be a body snatcher!
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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #944 on: November 29, 2010, 08:10:05 PM »
Oh yeah,I would love to see your recipe. I use my accidental homemade beer vinegar. ;)

The pork is great, a hunter frriend just brought it back from a hunting trip in GA.

First, heat pot over med heat, brown a small chopped onion dry.

After they start to get a little dark add  whole seed masala of kalongi, black mustard seed, fenugreek black pepper,bay leaf,a little gee or cooking oil. When the seeds start to crackle,get all toasty and release their yummy essential oils. Add the cubed pork and stir. Then add a small amount of chopped fresh garlic,and about three fresh curry leaves.Then add some chopped fresh tomatoes,green chilies (to taste). Add a small amount of turmeric, a cinnamon stick or a pinch of cinnamon, a healthy amount o fpaprika.Stir again,

At this time add sea salt (I like to use sea salt in Indian cooking cause basically Gandhi dealt the final blow to the English by making salt from the sea)

Then add malt vinegar and jaggery. to taste. or Reg vinegar and brown sugar.

Simmer till the meat is tender.

Im sorry I am not good at communicating amounts of ingredients. Depends on how much one is going to make; I dont measure, plus I would never tell another chef how much of an ingredient to use.

My father always calls me with cooking questions and just does not understand this. Or he will ask how long to cook something, I always tell him to cook it till it is done. He thinks I am f-ing with him.  ::)

Sounds pretty similar to mine, actually.  I sprinkle some salt, turmeric, and kashmiri chile powder on cubed meat (chicken, pork, or lamb, usually) and set it aside.

Then I slice onion into 1/4" half moons and cook over moderate heat until they're a deep golden brown.  Then I remove the onions and puree them with a little water.  I add the onion puree to a spice mixture of freshly ground dried red chiles, black pepper, black mustard seeds, cardamom seeds, fenugreek seeds, cumin seeds, and cinnamon stick.  I add a little brown sugar (jaggery, when I've got it) and some white wine vinegar -- BAM, there's my spice paste.

I reheat the oil in which I cooked the onions and add a mixture of freshly minced garlic and ginger, along with some freshly ground coriander.  When it's aromatic and a little toasty, I add the meat and lightly brown it.  Then I add the spice paste, some tomato sauce, and enough water or stock to cover the meat.  Sometimes I'll also add some diced potatoes.

When it's simmering nicely, I put it all in a preheated 300 degree oven, covered, and basically braise it until the meat is tender.  Serve with basmati and naan...mmm.
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