Author Topic: Ethnic and Regional Cooking  (Read 85199 times)

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #960 on: January 01, 2011, 06:18:48 PM »
My Grandpa grew up on an egg farm in the  western Lombardy region of Italy. He moved to Philadelphia during WW2. He brought this very recipe with him and made it every New Year for all of his life. Its simple but Im Lucky I learned it before he checked out. I apply the cooking technique to lots of other meat dishes.

It is now our family tradition to make it on New Years Day.

Braised Breast of Veal



We usually serve it with fried Parmesan polenta  or risotto. This year we served it with a wild mushroom risotto mantecato. Mantecato means a creamier version of risotto that actually has cream in it.




I usually dont eat veal cause it is expensive and a bit of a thought for me. But I cant resist this dish and breast of veal is usually pretty inexpensive. Pork rib roast can serve as a substitute.

Anyone want the recipe? I will write it out if so.

Risotto is kind of a strange time consuming cooking process but it is worth it.

« Last Edit: January 01, 2011, 06:39:51 PM by capozzoli »
Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline Pawtucket Patriot

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #961 on: January 03, 2011, 03:36:15 PM »
Yes please!  I would love that recipe.
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Offline EHall

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #962 on: January 03, 2011, 03:40:06 PM »
finally! someone who seems to have a grip on plating... especially when they're going to post pics of it.. thank you!

That risotto sounds great, you can definately put that recipe down too!
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #963 on: January 03, 2011, 05:00:57 PM »
Man Cap!

That has got to be one of the most impressive looking dishes I've seen you post.

Recipe please.  8)
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #964 on: January 03, 2011, 07:59:51 PM »
Braised Breast of Veal Lombardy style.

Take a large enough oven safe pot with a lid and get it hot over med. high. Just before adding the veal breast add veg or the like oil. (remember this, hot pot cold oil food wont stick) Olive oil will burn. Place the veal breast in bones up fat side down and brown, then turn to the bone side and brown. Remove the breast and set aside.

Then add Veg.to the hot pot: One small diced onion, a few sliced thick carrots, one stalk of diced celery, one head of garlic chopped fine, a fist full of peas (frozen work great). Add a chopped fine stalk of celery then toss and brown a little. Add some kosher salt, toss for a little while longer. (Need a good caramelizing action.) Deglaze with about a cup or so of hearty red wine. Then add about six or eight chopped tomatoes. Stir till the tomatoes start cooking. Then add a healthy pour of extra virgin olive oil to taste.

Add the herbs and spices, a couple of tablespoons each of oregano and basil. Add a teaspoon each of celery seed, grated nutmeg and black pepper. Then throw in a couple of bay leaves. Now, this is important; add a few stalks of fresh rosemary. You can use dry rosemary but I think the fresh rosemary is key. it definitely takes it up to the next level. Its good to use all fresh herbs but dry works great for everything but the rosemary. Turn the burner down to med low.

Turn the oven on and preheat to 350. With the ragu still at a simmer place the veal breast back in bone side down. Add some water till it comes up the about half way to the top of the veal breast leaving the fatty side exposed.

Taste the ragu and adjust salt and other flavors to your liking.

Cover the pot with the lid and put it in the oven. Roast it in the oven for three hours or until the meat starts pulling away from the bones and the top is all brown and roastylicious. Times may vary depending upon the size of your veal breast. 
Oh and after about two hours carefully take the pot out of the oven and add several peeled and cubed potatoes. Caution! Be very careful when the pot is sitting out on the stove. Keep a towel or oven mit on the lid cause at this point your house will smell most wonderful and passers by will be overwhelmed with the temptation to remove the lid and look in. If the touch lid with bare hands they will certainly leave some skin on it. Put the taters in and put the pot back in for the last hour or so. They are added late cause they will turn to mush if you add them to early.

You have my personal guarantee that this simple rustic dishh is a little slice of the real Italy and your house will smell that way.

This following recipe is exactly how I do risotto. It is the only way to make it correctly. The two most important rules are only use Aborrio or similar rice and  remember to add only hot liquids to the cooking rice, even heat the wine, cold or even room temperature liquids will ruin the rice.There are all different types of other things added but this is the basics. The above rice dish is cooked this way with chopped fresh, or dried and reconstituted wild mushrooms added early. After the rice is just about aldente shortly before it is finished add a couple of fist fulls of grated Locatteli and about a half cup of cream.

http://italianfood.about.com/od/tipstricks1/a/aa091697.htm

I think I covered everything.

















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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #965 on: January 04, 2011, 08:28:16 PM »
finally! someone who seems to have a grip on plating... especially when they're going to post pics of it.. thank you!

That risotto sounds great, you can definately put that recipe down too!

Thanks!. There are some nicely plated dishes in this forum section for sure. But me, Im the master plater.
Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #966 on: January 05, 2011, 03:47:40 AM »
Peking Roast Duck...

I took a duckling, halved it by removing the backbone, and dried it overnight on a rack in the refrigerator.  Tonight I took it out, applied a coating of sesame oil and a rub of salt, sugar, pepper, and five spice powder.  I roasted this in a very hot kettle grill around 475-500 degrees until it was 180 degrees internally.  To serve, my wife made the mandarin pancakes out of hot water dough and sesame oil, and I made a sauce with hoisin, green onions, honey, ginger, garlic, rice vinegar, wine, and soy sauce, accompanied with some green onion and cucumber slices.  It was great!



Sorry to dig this up, but what rations did you use for the salt/sugar/pepper/five-spice? Thinking about doing this for next month sometime.
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #967 on: January 05, 2011, 06:39:24 AM »
Excellent question!  LOL I really have no idea!!!

Well, my best guess is its a derivative of a Steven Raichlen recipe...gimme a sec, I'll see if I can dig it up.

Edit:  Turns out that I was being "creative"....Raichlen's original has just salt and pepper seasoning (no amounts) and the 5 spice is in the sauce only.  So I'm sure I just eyeballed it.  Hard to go wrong though...5 spice is potent stuff, but I probably used a pretty heavy hand with it, because I love the aroma so much.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 06:45:49 AM by nicneufeld »

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #968 on: January 12, 2011, 05:25:20 PM »
More from the Master Plater.

Portuguese

Moela (Chicken Gizard Stew) served with rice.

 

For desert, Trutas, a small fried sweet potato pie.

Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline beerocd

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #969 on: January 12, 2011, 05:50:10 PM »
The offal should have gone on the white plate since it has color, the White rice on the colored plate.
But you're still the Masterplater. You do it more than anyone else here. You even take pics.

I'm being kinda Irish tonight. Potatoes for dinner. I got a case of 40 count potatoes, they're pretty massive.
Topped with Chili, sour cream, butter, maybe some hot sauce.
The moral majority, is neither.

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #970 on: January 12, 2011, 06:24:46 PM »
The rice is off white.
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Offline beerocd

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #971 on: January 12, 2011, 06:25:43 PM »
The moral majority, is neither.

Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #972 on: January 12, 2011, 06:32:16 PM »
I'm going to try something that I can't find an instance of it existing, but it sounds like it would be good...

So ajvar is a Balkany mash of roasted red peppers, eggplant, and seasonings (I am a recently converted devotee!! of this stuff).  Baigan bharta is a name applied to a number of Indian roasted eggplant curries, mashes, and dips.

Soooo...A "Bhartvar" if you will...a bunch of red peppers and an eggplant or two...roasted over charcoal, peeled, mashed or blended, and then spiced with classic indian spices (ginger, garlic, cumin, coriander, turmeric, etc), and cooked down until a thick puree.

Seems like it would be a nice condiment with rotis or other breads.  A bit like a pickle, except, well, I'm not into Indian achars as much, at least the ones I've tried.

Offline beerocd

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #973 on: January 12, 2011, 06:39:34 PM »
Before you do that to the whole batch, have you just added your spices to the stuff out of the jar to make sure they play nice together?

And the blender will probably make it too much of a mush - or even soup depending on what blender you have. We always used a meat grinder on coarse for the peppers and eggplant.

I am interested to hear about how it turns out, but I don't think I can do that to ajvar. One last thing, saute garlic in olive oil and then dump ajvar on top of it and just cook it until it turns a much darker red, stirring occasionally. Eat it warm on fresh bread.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2011, 06:43:52 PM by beerocd »
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
« Reply #974 on: January 13, 2011, 06:44:14 AM »
Before you do that to the whole batch, have you just added your spices to the stuff out of the jar to make sure they play nice together?

And the blender will probably make it too much of a mush - or even soup depending on what blender you have. We always used a meat grinder on coarse for the peppers and eggplant.

I am interested to hear about how it turns out, but I don't think I can do that to ajvar. One last thing, saute garlic in olive oil and then dump ajvar on top of it and just cook it until it turns a much darker red, stirring occasionally. Eat it warm on fresh bread.

I dare not waste the stuff in the jar!  Really, its not much different than an eggplant curry, except with peppers added.  Pureeing it does "wet it up" a bit but cooking it down works to remove moisture from my one experiment.