Author Topic: Ethnic and Regional Cooking  (Read 105124 times)

Offline beerocd

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #75 on: December 13, 2009, 06:50:17 PM »

I will post the whole recipe, but does anyone really want me too?  ::)

Yep - Liver ROCKS!

Maslenica - can't find anyone who knows of it.  Maybe it's something newer like within the last 30 years or so?


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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #76 on: December 13, 2009, 08:00:35 PM »
I dont know for sure but Im gonna guess that it is not a new dish.

Maybe it is a Croatian dish and not really popular among Serbs?

Founda couple of more recipes for it.http://www.elsgnoms.com/receptes/yugo.htm



The Chicken Liver dish is called." Kuracia Pechienka na rasci " literally translates to Chicken livers on caraway seeds.

Heat up a saute pan and brown sweat some onions till they start to brown. Add a few cloves of garlic chopped. Move the onions and garlic aside in the pan and add a tablespoon of caraway seeds. Then when the seeds start to krakle a little stir into the onions. Add some marjoram, salt pepper, and a table spoon or more of paprika. I like a lot, the wife likes less.

Add the chicken livers and let them brown a little, then turn them over and sear them on the other side. All the while making sure thayt the onions and garlic do not burn. Then add about a cup or more of chicken broth. stir for a moent and then add some butter roux in small parts at a time gradually until it makes a silky thick sauce. Typically this dish is served with rice but mashed potatoes go great with it too.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2009, 08:14:52 PM by capozzoli »
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #77 on: December 14, 2009, 10:21:46 AM »
Italian again last night.

Chicken Marsala. We call this American style Marsala cause it is different from the traditional way it was made in the old country.  



Good stuff!

One of the wife's favs.


There's not a dish I've tried that I didn't like with mushrooms as the complementary ingredient.

Once again complements to the chef!  ;)
Ron Price

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #78 on: December 14, 2009, 07:23:42 PM »
Slovakian again tonight.

Slovakian style Goulash.

Also, Goulash is a great dish to make in a presure cooker. The beef in this stew is heel meat. Very flavorful cuts but very tough and require a great deal of cooking time because they have tendon in them. Ordinarily you would have to cook heel meat for two hours or more. two lbs of meat with two large onions.

This Goulash was made in the pressure cooker in less than a half hour. A half hour including prep time.



Also running a test here and putting up videos as an experiment. Nothing special yet just the pressure cooker in action.  Gonna try to take this cooking demonstration thing to a whole new level.  ;) If all works out I should be able to make it like a cooking show. I dont really want to show my face so I may wear a rubber chicken mask or something. Could be fun.

Anyways, Take the pot part of your pressure cooker and get it hot. Put in a little oil and brown the beef that you have cut up into 1"-2" cubes. Heel meat works best ($1.29 per lb) or some other less expensive cut. add a a little salt, then add two large onions or so, brown with the meat. (nothing smells better than beef and onions saute together!) well almost nothing. ::)



Then add some chopped up saurkraut, I used some of my homemade sourkrat even though it still needs another week or so till it is completely done. Sort of "half" sour kraut.



Let all of the beef, onions and kraut caramelize in the pot stir from time to time for about ten mins. Add a teaspoon of caraway seeds, a teaspoon of marjoram, two table spoons of paprika or more to taste. Then add water, or beef broth to the pot enough to cover the meat by about an inch. Then add a couple of carrots sliced up and a couple of bay leaves.



Put the lid on the pressure cooker and turn the heat up till the little weighted relief valve begins to dance violently then turn it down till the little thingy dances like this.
"http://static.photobucket.com/player.swf?file=http://vid291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/MOV08533.flv">

Then let it do that for about 20 mins. You will be amzed that when you open the pot every thing is cooked perfectly. But before you open it you have to release the pressure by lifting the weight. Use a long utensil or knife so you are not burned by the steam.
"http://static.photobucket.com/player.swf?file=http://vid291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/MOV08535.flv">

Do this till all of the steam and pressure have been relieved.

Then remove the lid and a a little roux to thicken it a little bit. After it is a little thicker add about a cup or so of sour cream. Stir till blended and smooth.

This time I am serving it with little egg bow ties. Usually we have it with Hungarian dumplings (spatzle) or CZ dumplings as you guys may know.

This meal also accompanied beautifully by som CZ beer from Bluesman. Thanks again bro! Beer...the gift that keeps on giving...well, for a little while anyway.











« Last Edit: December 14, 2009, 08:16:51 PM by capozzoli »
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #79 on: December 15, 2009, 07:54:43 PM »
Peking Roast Duck...

I took a duckling, halved it by removing the backbone, and dried it overnight on a rack in the refrigerator.  Tonight I took it out, applied a coating of sesame oil and a rub of salt, sugar, pepper, and five spice powder.  I roasted this in a very hot kettle grill around 475-500 degrees until it was 180 degrees internally.  To serve, my wife made the mandarin pancakes out of hot water dough and sesame oil, and I made a sauce with hoisin, green onions, honey, ginger, garlic, rice vinegar, wine, and soy sauce, accompanied with some green onion and cucumber slices.  It was great!


Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #80 on: December 15, 2009, 07:57:38 PM »
Looks and sounds fantastic.  ;)
Ron Price

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #81 on: December 16, 2009, 05:48:00 PM »
Nic, Duck looks freaking great. Was it tender? Duck can be hit or miss sometimes.

I have had a lot of luck by marinating it and then steaming it whole for a couple of houors. then I finish it in a 500 degree oven for an a half or or so. Comes out tender on the inside crispy on the outside. Same thing I dod with the deep fried crispy aromatic duck.

Romanian stuffed cabbage with Hungarian Langosh tonight.



Langosh is a fried dough bread. The dough is made with flour eggs mashed potatoes and eggs. After it is rolled thin and fried it is brushed with a very light coat of crushed garlic and oil. Then it is slathered with sour cream and topped with gtated cheese. We used locatelli tonight nigh but you can use just about any cheese. I thik Guyere is recommended cause it is closest to what they use in Hungary.

The Romanian stuffed cabbage is interesting cause it is leaves of cabbage that have been fermented with the kraut. They are sauerkraut leaves. When you make the stuffing it is browned onions and garlic. Ground meat (I used venison) Rice, salt pepper, marjoram, paprika, pinch of caraway seeds. Brown a little more and then add about a quarter cup of chopped saurkrat. Toss a little more till alll ingredients are well cooked. Set aside to cool. When cool add about two eggs and blend till all of the ingredients are coated with the egg. Then roll the leaves around the stuffing.

For the sauce just mix tomato paste, paprika, salt pepper, marjoram, brown sugar and chicken broth. Blend till smooth then layer the stuffed cabbages into a casserole with the sauce. Bake till cooked through and the leaves are tender.

The Hungarian word for kiss is Pussy, for beer is sor, (pronounced sure) wine is bor. And to say hello you say szia (pronounced see ya).

Fun stuff.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #82 on: December 17, 2009, 11:23:11 AM »
Hey Capp - The Romanian stuffed cabbage is very similiar to Polish Golabki. I'll have to make my Baci's recipe and post it!

They are fantastic! Great with some good lagered beer.

Ron Price

Offline beerocd

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #83 on: December 17, 2009, 11:33:09 AM »
Hey Capp - The Romanian stuffed cabbage is very similiar to Polish Golabki. I'll have to make my Baci's recipe and post it!

They are fantastic! Great with some good lagered beer.



What's inside em? That's fresh cabbage right? Not pickled?
Looks good!

-OCD
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #84 on: December 17, 2009, 12:40:07 PM »
Hey Capp - The Romanian stuffed cabbage is very similiar to Polish Golabki. I'll have to make my Baci's recipe and post it!

They are fantastic! Great with some good lagered beer.



What's inside em? That's fresh cabbage right? Not pickled?
Looks good!

-OCD

Here's a similiar recipe. I like alot of fresh crushed tomato sauce and black pepper with mine.

Cabbage Rolls (Golabki)

1 head cabbage
1 lb. ground beef
1/2 lb. ground pork or veal (optional)
16 oz can tomato sauce
8 oz can tomatoes
2 cups cooked rice
2 eggs
1 onion finely chopped
2 Tbsp. margarine
Salt and pepper to taste

Remove the core from the cabbage. Put the cabbage in boiling water and remove the leaves as they soften. sauté the onions in the margarine for a short time. In a bowl add the onions, meat, rice, eggs and salt and pepper, mix this well.

Place about 2 Tbsp. Of the meat mixture in the center of a cabbage leaf and roll. Put the meat rolls in a large pot and pour the tomato sauce onto the rolls. Then squeeze tomatoes from can and arrange on top of the rolls. Simmer over low heat for 2 hours.
Ron Price

Offline redbeerman

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #85 on: December 17, 2009, 01:40:19 PM »
If that don't stick to your ribs, nothin' will. ;D
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #86 on: December 18, 2009, 05:51:31 AM »
The Ukrainian style stuffed cabbages are stuffed using millet. The sauce is made with sour cream and paprika, sorta like the paprikash sauce.  Pretty damn good.

I had stuffed cabbage in a middle eastern restaurant once too. Seems just about every country has a version of stuffed cabbage.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #87 on: December 27, 2009, 03:58:40 PM »
Italian...

Calamari and Crab FraDiavalo on a bed of capilini



Another one of my very favorite meals in the whole world.

FraDiavalo is a spicy hot marinara sauce.

I used Cleaned squid tubes and pasteurized jumbo lump. They had these 6 oz vacume packs on sale for $8, which is unbeliveably cheap for jumbo lump.

For enough  marinara to go with a whole box of pasta.

I  peel and chop a whole head of garlic. Then I chop part of or a very small onion. I chop a stalk of celery.  Over medium heat satue the onions garlic and celery. To taste add Oregano, basil, rosemary, celery seed, old bay spice, bay leaf and salt and pepper. At the very end of the saute add crushed hot peppers. De glaze with a little white wine or better yet a little Marsala. Go light on the wine. Then add a large can of  diced tomatoes with about a 1/2 cup of tomato paste. Add water till it reaches a bothy consistency. Simmer covered for about an hour and add water as needed to maintain a 'brothy' marinara consistency.

After the sauce is completely cooked and the diced tomatoes are beginning to wilt and break down. Slice the calamari into rings. Put the sauce over medium heat and then add the calamari ring. * it is important to note that if you over cook calamari it will become really chewy. The idea is to 'threaten' them with heat. Cook them in the sauce for about ten to fifteen min. Take one out and try it till it is cooked yet tender. Then add your crab meat, toos gently for a few mins and then remove the sauce from the burner. Let it rest covered while you cook your pasta.

Cook the past till it is just about finished then strain, .Add a ladle full of the sauce and a healthy pour of extra virgin olive oil. Gently oss the pasta in the till coated, cover and let it rest a few mins. Then plate the pasta and top with the sauce.

Garnish with some flat Italian parsley and a squeeze of lemon. 

Now that is eating Italian.
 
In Italian they say: 'Mangiare le mie palle!!! '  It means Eat well.

Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline beerocd

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #88 on: December 27, 2009, 08:44:04 PM »
Alright, I should be making some "postno" cabbage rolls this week. Should have pictures and recipe soon.....
I don't have keseo cupus, so we'll be boiling the cabbage in vinegar and water to soften it.
Walnuts and leek is the only thing I have planned so far - I'll let you know. Fasting prior to our Christmas so should be interesting.

-OCD
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Ethnic Cooking
« Reply #89 on: December 28, 2009, 06:36:48 PM »
So you guys use the fermented kraut too for stuffing, like the Romanians? I know a Russian guy who stuffs the whole head and then slow roasts it over open coals. falls apart when you cut into it but OMG. is it good.

Do Serbian cooks use polenta? Must be some Italian influence there, right?

I would love to see and hear more about Serbian cooking. Christmas feast sounds great what with a whole roast pig and all. Next Christmas we are doing the seven fishes but maybe we will do the Serbian Christmas feast the year after that.

I still havent done the Georgian thing but it is on deck.

Beer, its whats for dinner.

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