Author Topic: My IPA changes drastically over time  (Read 2130 times)

Offline dannyjed

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My IPA changes drastically over time
« on: July 12, 2012, 09:43:26 AM »
I made my IPA and it tasted great the first few weeks in the keg and now it's not so good.  I put it in a competition and the judges ripped it for being solventy.  So I came home and tasted it and I could see where they were coming from.  It did not taste that way a couple weeks ago, in fact, my wife and I thought it was great. I know IPA's should be consumed when they are young or fresh, but it seems that mine have a small window when they taste good.  This fact has made it hard for me to get the timing right for competitions.  Has anyone else had this problem?  Am I making too big of a deal out of this?  What could make this beer have a solvent flavor?
Dan Chisholm

Offline erockrph

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Re: My IPA changes drastically over time
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2012, 09:55:19 AM »
Maybe the hops covered the solvent notes when the beer was super fresh and now that the hops have faded it's starting to show through a bit more? How's your fermentation temps?
Eric B.

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Offline tomsawyer

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Re: My IPA changes drastically over time
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2012, 09:56:00 AM »
+1 High ferm temps are the most common cause of solventy beer.
Lennie
Hannibal, MO

Offline dannyjed

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Re: My IPA changes drastically over time
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2012, 09:59:39 AM »
I didn't think of that.  It fermented at 66.  I bottled 1 gal for the competition and it was in the 80's while I was bottling - could that be a problem?
Dan Chisholm

Offline tomsawyer

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Re: My IPA changes drastically over time
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2012, 12:16:33 PM »
No but maybe if the room was 66F then the beer got up into the mid-70's from the heat given off during fermentation.  Also maybe the spot it was sitting in was a little warmer than 66.
Lennie
Hannibal, MO

Offline majorvices

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Re: My IPA changes drastically over time
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2012, 12:49:45 PM »
Sounds like possibly oxidation to me. I'm not exactly sure about the science but seems like I remember reading somewhere that oxidation can cause solventy notes, especially when coupled with higher fermentation temps. But empirical evidence suggest to me that oxidation alone can cause this, even with low fermentation temps. I've seen this happen in some of my beers as well, especially in IPA's. I also wonder if the hop compounds can become oxidized and cause the flavor you speak of.
Keith Y.
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Offline dannyjed

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Re: My IPA changes drastically over time
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2012, 02:55:31 PM »
Sounds like possibly oxidation to me. I'm not exactly sure about the science but seems like I remember reading somewhere that oxidation can cause solventy notes, especially when coupled with higher fermentation temps. But empirical evidence suggest to me that oxidation alone can cause this, even with low fermentation temps. I've seen this happen in some of my beers as well, especially in IPA's. I also wonder if the hop compounds can become oxidized and cause the flavor you speak of.
I was thinking along these same lines.  Last year about this same time I had an IPA get oxidized (I think), I forgot to purge the keg and I dry hopped in a secondary without purging the carboy.  That one turned out to be a very harsh bitterness after a few weeks in the keg.  So I was thinking if the hops (Columbus, Amarillo, Cascade) could also contribute to this flavor.  I also dry hopped with Columbus and Cenntennial.
Dan Chisholm