Author Topic: Overnight mash  (Read 5578 times)

Offline punatic

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Re: Overnight mash
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2012, 10:44:29 AM »
Book?
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Offline ccfoo242

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Intra cervisiam est deus.

Offline toast26

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Re: Overnight mash
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2012, 07:08:42 PM »
Maybe not an overnight mash, but an all day one. Mashed in at 4:30 am, hit a temp of 156* on the Halcyon Wheat kit from NB. In a 5 gal cooler set up, I dropped to 139 after 15 hours. (Damned kids take up even more time than I had planned for.) No souring that I could detect, fermented from 1.054 to 1.007 with US-05. Should be carbed in a week or so.

I am not sure how much time this saves me, maybe an hour or so in the evening. But in my case, with kids and wife and the rest of the American Dream to contend with, this method forces me to brew the beers I know I want to get brewed, when the weekends are just too booked up. I'll do it again for sure. From all the reading on forums I've done, it sounds to me like this method can be used for either clean beers or sour ones. Just comes down to temp management.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Overnight mash
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2012, 09:00:27 PM »
Maybe not an overnight mash, but an all day one. Mashed in at 4:30 am, hit a temp of 156* on the Halcyon Wheat kit from NB. In a 5 gal cooler set up, I dropped to 139 after 15 hours. (Damned kids take up even more time than I had planned for.) No souring that I could detect, fermented from 1.054 to 1.007 with US-05. Should be carbed in a week or so.

I am not sure how much time this saves me, maybe an hour or so in the evening. But in my case, with kids and wife and the rest of the American Dream to contend with, this method forces me to brew the beers I know I want to get brewed, when the weekends are just too booked up. I'll do it again for sure. From all the reading on forums I've done, it sounds to me like this method can be used for either clean beers or sour ones. Just comes down to temp management.

Thanks for the reassurance. I usually wait until I put my son to bed to start my brewday, but now that I've made the jump to all-grain I may be able to mash-in between the time I get home from work and when I pick him up from daycare. Unless it's something I want real low attenuation on, then I feel OK if I have to leave it in the mash tun for 2-3 hours before I can run it off and start my boil.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline Kit B

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Re: Overnight mash
« Reply #19 on: July 30, 2012, 01:35:58 PM »
and arrogant to think that everyone bought his book.

I just think it's unfortunate that Gordon didn't actually give an answer that those of us who don't own the book will be able to read.
I'd like to read his answer, but...
My lhbs has chosen not to carry his book (for whatever reason).
So, I haven't gotten around to paying the $18 + shipping & probably won't.

I'm hoping maybe someone will share the knowledge, without charging me a fee.
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Offline brewmasternpb

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Re: Overnight mash
« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2012, 09:10:32 PM »
Luckily, lots of others did!  It was great info guys, thanks!
Dave Malone
The Greater Denver Yeast Infection