Author Topic: Balancing bitterness, flavor, and aroma in IPA  (Read 6543 times)

Offline bigchicken

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Re: Balancing bitterness, flavor, and aroma in IPA
« Reply #15 on: August 17, 2012, 03:17:32 PM »
Something not mentioned but can be a big help is looking at recipe kits sold by the big homebrew shops. Northern Brewer puts their recipes in a PDF. Read the reviews and start formulating your recipe from there. Or buy a kit, document what it has, then adjust to your liking the next time. Some of those kits make fantastic beers.
And a big +1 to getting your water filtered. It can really help.
TJ Cook
Proud paying member of the AHA since 2013.

Fermenting: NOTHING!
In bottles: One Fruit Fly Saison, Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Ale, Snow Eater Winter Warmer

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Balancing bitterness, flavor, and aroma in IPA
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2012, 12:06:18 AM »
Yeah, stick with the Seattle water, it is great as is.  Either filter it or get some campden tablets to remove the chlorine.

The other thing to do is join a club - lots of good clubs and friendy homebrewers in our area, always happy to help out newbies.  http://www.wahomebrewers.org/community/clubs?task=category&sectionid=5
Tom Schmidlin

Offline alcaponejunior

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Re: Balancing bitterness, flavor, and aroma in IPA
« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2012, 03:28:53 AM »
In my DIPA, I only put 1 oz of hops into the 60 min addition.  The next 9 oz get spread out equally in 15, 10, 5, and 0 min additions,  with another 1.5 oz for dry hop.  So, very little in the 60 min, and everything in late additions. I have been very happy with this.

I have also been doing my partial mash beers with lots of late hops, with great results.  My last IPA (5 gallons) had 93 IBUs and came out quite good.  I used an ounce of chinook at 60, then a bunch of columbus, chinook and willamette late and dry. 

full schedule here

Also I agree that a good gram scale is a needed investment. 

BTW I am using bottled spring water.