Author Topic: Peanut Butter Brew  (Read 5566 times)

Offline pjj2ba

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2009, 07:12:39 PM »
I've been messing around with cooking hops in hot oil for brewing (crazy - yeah I know) and have found that lecithin can counteract the head robbing properties of oils.  My last experiment had 6 Tbsp of cooking oil go into the mash along with 2 Tbsp of Lecithin (liquid).  This beer ended up with a fabulous head

Offline karlh

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #16 on: December 16, 2009, 10:32:11 AM »
I've been messing around with cooking hops in hot oil for brewing (crazy - yeah I know) and have found that lecithin can counteract the head robbing properties of oils.  My last experiment had 6 Tbsp of cooking oil go into the mash along with 2 Tbsp of Lecithin (liquid).  This beer ended up with a fabulous head

This may be the result of oils sticking to the particles/cellulose present in the mash rather than the presence or absence of lecithin.  A few years ago the lab I worked in was looking at the quantity of oil transferred from coffee beans to finished coffee and we found that virtually all of the oil was sticking to the cellulose (paper) coffee filters.  This was not the case with French Press, as there was no cellulose filter.  The fibers bond with the molecules of oil due to relative charge, and this may happen with the husks present in the mash as well.  Lecithin may aid the process as well.  I wouldn't be surprised if most of the oils present in the mash stay in the mash. 
Karl
Mundelein, IL  USA

Offline yugamrap

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #17 on: December 16, 2009, 11:29:14 AM »
Our club did a "Strange Brew" contest not long ago where we each drew "strange" ingredients (e.g., Jolly Rancher candies, marshmallow fluff, breakfast cereal, black pepper, licorice, oysters, etc.) from a hat, then had to make a beer with whatever ingredient we drew.  The brewer who drew peanut butter found a powdered peanut butter product that was very low in oil.  His beer had decent head retention.  The peanut butter flavor was present, but not very strong.

FWIW, there were around 18 entries.  1st place was Robust Porter with Licorice, 2nd was Black Pepper IPA, and 3rd was Jolly Rancher American Wheat.   
...it's liquid bread, it's good for you!

Offline beerrat

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #18 on: December 23, 2009, 08:23:01 PM »
I think this is a fantastic idea.  I've been thinking about this every time I sit at a major league ball park and am chomping on peanuts and drinking the local "house" pilsner.  Old Style at Wrigley with the salted peanuts..  In my exploration, I have seen references to making/using de-oiled pb in the boil.  I have also see references of a brew pub using a brand name PB - jiff or the like, and dumping it into the boil.  I'm looking for my notes on proportions, as well as links and will post once I find.  Here is one thread I have been watching - for a stout - http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/peanut-butter-porter-w-powdered-peanut-butter-61538.

I want to do a pilsner or a pale ale with the PB to capture that ball park feel.

Offline bigfatjoey

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #19 on: December 27, 2009, 11:46:52 AM »
I want to do a pilsner or a pale ale with the PB to capture that ball park feel.
[/quote]

A Ball park brew.  I like it.  Mine is going more for the Reeses Peanut butter feel.

I'm bottling this week.  Just a few more days to see if it is a success or a disaster.
Ol' Edge Brew  -  Brewed and Enjoyed with Friends

Offline akr71

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #20 on: December 31, 2009, 12:51:49 PM »
I don't have any advice, only a comment: Yuck!  ;)

I'll see your "Yuck!" and raise you a "BLECH!"
+1 to that

But if you insist - natural, preservative free peanut butter will seperate.  Pour the oil off the top & go from there.  You won't get all the oil out, but most of it.
Andy

Amherst, NS - Canada

Offline ted_manahan

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2010, 09:37:11 PM »
Why would this be different from using Chocolate? I have made a chocolate porter that had decent head retention. When you rack off of primary, leave behind the top inch of beer; that will contain any residual oils.

Offline bbump22

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2010, 03:55:28 PM »
A microbrewery in seattle brewed a Peanut Butter porter for a strange brew contest.  I over heard him talking to some one about how once they got the oil out of the peanut butter they put it in there secondary carboy and let the beer condition on top....when i tried a sample, it had the aroma from the peanut butter, but still tasted like a porter and had good head retention...it was an interesting beer.  I'm guessing you might use cheese cloth to let the oil drain out or the method mentioned about letting the oil come to the top, then dump it and repeat...that method seems more sanitary. 

This is a late reply to the post.  Did you ever try brewing it?  if so, any lessons learned?
mmmm....beer

Offline mikeypedersen

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #23 on: March 12, 2010, 09:19:18 AM »
I'm bottling this week.  Just a few more days to see if it is a success or a disaster.

So......How did it turn out?

Offline jwatkins56550

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #24 on: March 17, 2010, 02:22:48 PM »
I say go for it, and see if your head retention is effected, then alter your recipe next time if it suffers.

  It's a balancing act going on in every beer....there are foam negative properties and foam positive properties.  Like for instance, a Belgian Golden Strong has wonderful head retention but also has a lot of foam negative properties...why?  Mainly because the high hopping rates negate the foam negative properties. 

Offline ndcube

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #25 on: March 19, 2010, 07:10:49 AM »
I say go for it, and see if your head retention is effected, then alter your recipe next time if it suffers.

  It's a balancing act going on in every beer....there are foam negative properties and foam positive properties.  Like for instance, a Belgian Golden Strong has wonderful head retention but also has a lot of foam negative properties...why?  Mainly because the high hopping rates negate the foam negative properties. 

Woudn't the oils from the hops be foam negative as well?  Is a golden strong really that hoppy?

Offline narvin

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2010, 07:23:18 AM »
Please do not reply if your an evil alien!
Thanks
Chris S.

Offline jwatkins56550

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Re: Peanut Butter Brew
« Reply #27 on: March 19, 2010, 07:57:42 PM »
I say go for it, and see if your head retention is effected, then alter your recipe next time if it suffers.

  It's a balancing act going on in every beer....there are foam negative properties and foam positive properties.  Like for instance, a Belgian Golden Strong has wonderful head retention but also has a lot of foam negative properties...why?  Mainly because the high hopping rates negate the foam negative properties. 

Woudn't the oils from the hops be foam negative as well?  Is a golden strong really that hoppy?

Yes the oils would be foam negative, but if they were outweighed by foam positive properties then the oils wouldn't really matter.  A golden strong isn't hoppy like an IPA or pale ale, but it is firmly bittered.  I had asked this same question about golden strong to Simon Jackson of the IBD.