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composting spent grain

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Delo:

--- Quote from: mabrungard on August 23, 2012, 05:19:38 AM ---Its imperative that you avoid letting the mass of grain go septic (anaerobic).  The smell is horrendous! 

--- End quote ---

Absolutely.  The best way of doing this is to add in a lot of carbon(brown material) like paper or wood and to make sure the pile is well mixed so there are no pockets of anaerobic activity. I use free woods chips from our county.  Spent grain has a lot of moisture in it already so this is even more important to mix well and add carbon. Vegetables scraps, Coffee, Grass clippings, and green leaves/plant cuttings  are green material. The more you have of them in the compost pile the more carbon you have to add to the spent grain.  If you have a compost pile already, cover the grain with composted soil after mixing in the carbon.  Covering the spent grain will help keep the smell down and unwanted pests like mice and rats away.  I live in an urban area and our yard is small, so I have to pay attention to our compost pile or our neighbors will complain.  I think the most I put in my compost bin in a week was 40 to 50 lbs without problems.

jamminbrew:
I like to make dog treats, and I have a friend who has a small farm, and she has several pigs who love to eat the left over grains!

the_pig:
Thanks for all the tips!  I also live in an urban area, so it's good to have these warnings going in.

I don't have a dog, but my daughter (who lives nearby) does.  How do you make dog biscuits?  Squish together and bake?

kmccaf:

--- Quote from: Slowbrew on August 23, 2012, 05:44:12 AM ---I have a large enough yard that I can simply spread the spent grain on the lawn.  I basically put it in a homer bucket, use a large spoon and broadcast spread it as if I were planting wheat in the days before modern equipment.  The squirrels love it and it decomposes without any issues.


The only time it has ever gotten a little ripe was a year or two ago in the spring.  I had brewed quite a bit over the winter.  When the snow melted I had a lot of grain on the ground and it was all wet.  A little sun and a couple passes of the lawn mower got rid of it though.

Paul

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+1 I do the same thing.  The squirrels and birds go nuts for it, especially in the Winter, and it is usually gone within 24 hours. But when spring hit, and they actually had something else to eat...that's when it started to get a little ripe.

I spread it way in the back, so I don't ever actually smell it.

micsager:

--- Quote from: the_pig on August 23, 2012, 09:59:18 AM ---Thanks for all the tips!  I also live in an urban area, so it's good to have these warnings going in.

I don't have a dog, but my daughter (who lives nearby) does.  How do you make dog biscuits?  Squish together and bake?

--- End quote ---

Just google it, and you'll find many recipes.  Most include some peanut butter.  But be careful there are no hops in it. 

I have a co-worker with small pig farm, and they love the spent grain.  And now that I'm brew 40-50 gallons a month, it's helpful to have a good way to get rid of this grain.  And, the pork chops I get each fall are good too. 

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