Author Topic: Fresh cut pumpkin taste  (Read 900 times)

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7225
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Fresh cut pumpkin taste
« on: February 15, 2010, 10:30:48 AM »
For the first time ever I got it. My last brew the S04 fermented way lower than usual. It was very cold for a while and the beer slipped down into the mid-upper 50's for several days- even in the insulated fermentation chamber.

Never really got it above 65 during three weeks in the fermentor.

My test samples exhibited the Acetaldehyde flavor of freshly cut pumpkin. I think it is disgusting. Seems like it is the signs of incomplete fermentation. According to Palmer one should use cooler temps...?

It got kegged up and placed where it is a little warmer for the last three weeks.

Never experienced it before. Not pleased. Is this something that will sort itself out with time?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline beerocd

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1400
    • View Profile
Re: Fresh cut pumpkin taste
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2010, 11:39:08 AM »
If it doesn't age out; could you "dry hop" it with pie spices and say that's what you were shooting for?
What was the beer supposed to be?
The moral majority, is neither.

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7225
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: Fresh cut pumpkin taste
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2010, 11:50:53 AM »
Ordinary Bitter.

And I don't care for spiced beer :'(

Hoping it'll age out. Never dealt with this before. Hate to toss 2 kegs down the drain.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline seajellie

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
    • View Profile
Re: Fresh cut pumpkin taste
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2010, 06:25:43 PM »
I've had it twice, tho to me it's "green apple." It was so prevelant that even folks who knew nothing about beer said "smells like green apples!" as their very first comment.

Both times, it aged out, and actually turned into fantastic beer. Took a month or more though. So don't dump it!

These beers were bottled lagers which were kept at 45 to 60 degrees (after a normal lagering period in carboys). So based on that I would guess that keeping the beer at a temperature that the yeast are still active, is a possibly important thing. You should be at an advantage though being in kegs, with a greater healthy yeast concentration available to process this.


Offline The Professor

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 769
  • "In the next life, you're on your own"
    • View Profile
Re: Fresh cut pumpkin taste
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2010, 09:03:59 PM »
...Hate to toss 2 kegs down the drain.

Don't toss it down the drain!

I haven't had very many spoiled batches ...maybe two or three over the last 25 years...but I have never had to toss any.  Unless there are really nasty things going on, a soured or out-of-balance beer can very often make a good marinade for roasted, barbecued, and grilled meats.  Try that before you toss anything...why waste it if you don't need to?
AL
New Brunswick, NJ
[499.6, 101.2] Apparent Rennerian
Homebrewer since July 1971

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7225
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: Fresh cut pumpkin taste
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2010, 10:48:37 AM »
...Hate to toss 2 kegs down the drain.

Don't toss it down the drain!

I haven't had very many spoiled batches ...maybe two or three over the last 25 years...but I have never had to toss any.  Unless there are really nasty things going on, a soured or out-of-balance beer can very often make a good marinade for roasted, barbecued, and grilled meats.  Try that before you toss anything...why waste it if you don't need to?

Hmmm. That's a good idea! As soon as a spot opens up in the kegerator we'll find out if it is marinade-grade... ;D
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline 1vertical

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2525
  • [1131.2, 279.6] Apparent Rennerian
    • View Profile
Re: Fresh cut pumpkin taste
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2010, 11:15:30 AM »
My one time experience with this was cured by RDWHAHB
and just giving the yeast more time to clean up
A fine is a tax for doing wrong. A tax is a fine for doing well.

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7225
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: Fresh cut pumpkin taste
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2010, 01:15:06 AM »
Keg is in and tapped. Since the beer is about 60F I drew a pint after dumping one. Pumpkin flavor all gone...  ;D Perfectly carbonated with good copper clarity for the second pint.

Holy cow i was afraid of losing this batch. Now I gotta brew again...
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman