Author Topic: Judging Question - German Wheat Category 15  (Read 2830 times)

Offline marcpowell

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Judging Question - German Wheat Category 15
« on: September 18, 2012, 07:52:20 AM »
Obviously, we know that Hefes taste better with the yeast in the glass, but how do you go about doing it for competitions?  Do you give the bottle a gentle stir before pouring your small 2 oz pours, or do you just not add it?  I dont think I've ever judged this category, but I have entered a few.  I just wonder if they are getting the right treatment as this is something I've been thinking about. When they are just sitting around in the fridge or in the cooler waiting to be judged, the yeast all settles out. 

What's the protocol for you guys?  I'd like to hear what Gordon says if he's listening.   :)  If I ever do judge this style, I'd like to do it correctly. 
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Offline tom

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Re: Judging Question - German Wheat Category 15
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2012, 10:37:44 AM »
At competitions we "rouse" the yeast by gently rolling the bottle on the table to mix up the yeast.
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Offline tomsawyer

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Re: Judging Question - German Wheat Category 15
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2012, 10:53:35 AM »
I've never roused, although I take less care in the pour than with other styles.  I think the beer is cloudy from the powdery yeast and the wheat protein, so it shouldn't necessarily need to be rolled.  I don't typically take off too much for a hefe thats cleared.
Lennie
Hannibal, MO

Offline marcpowell

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Re: Judging Question - German Wheat Category 15
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2012, 11:41:03 AM »
I've never roused, although I take less care in the pour than with other styles.  I think the beer is cloudy from the powdery yeast and the wheat protein, so it shouldn't necessarily need to be rolled.  I don't typically take off too much for a hefe thats cleared.

I'm not too worried about the appearance, but there's obviously a flavor component missing when the yeast has settled out and isnt poured into the tasting glass. 
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: Judging Question - German Wheat Category 15
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2012, 05:29:46 AM »
As an afficionado of the style and multi-time judge of the category at the first and second rounds, I strongly feel that rousing the yeast in a weizen is desirable.  It can be a significant component of the flavor and if the brewer made the effort to include a yeast charge or bottle condition that beer, I feel that its appropriate to include that component in my evaluation. 

If the bottle has sediment, I may try to rouse via rolling the bottle.  Sometimes that is insufficient to get it into suspension.  So after pouring a sample, there is usually enough headspace so that I can swirl the bottle to help suspend the yeast before getting an eruption of foam.  The rest of the beer samples can be poured from that result.
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Offline tomsawyer

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Re: Judging Question - German Wheat Category 15
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2012, 07:15:34 AM »
So other than krystalweizen, we are supposed to be suspending the yeast sediment in hefeweizen, dunkelweizen and weizenbock?  I admit to being interested in hearing others' opinions on this.  I didn't see any mention in the BJCP guidelines.  I know its a common enough practice for hefeweizen, and there is a flavor contribution.  I think a fresh hefe is going to have some suspended yeast anyway.
Lennie
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Offline rjharper

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Re: Judging Question - German Wheat Category 15
« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2012, 09:04:12 AM »
So other than krystalweizen, we are supposed to be suspending the yeast sediment in hefeweizen, dunkelweizen and weizenbock?  I admit to being interested in hearing others' opinions on this.  I didn't see any mention in the BJCP guidelines.  I know its a common enough practice for hefeweizen, and there is a flavor contribution.  I think a fresh hefe is going to have some suspended yeast anyway.

The difference in flavour of two bottles of my dunkelweizen off the shelf, one roused and the other poured carefully, is significant.  Without the yeast in suspension, I find weizens very one dimensional, and so I can see judging a weizen without the yeast to be quite detrimental to the score. If I'm pouring for a keg that's been sitting, I'll go so far as to invert the keg before dispensing.
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