Author Topic: Potato beer  (Read 2193 times)

Offline gmac

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Potato beer
« on: October 01, 2012, 10:42:50 AM »
Anyone make that potato beer that is running on the AHA homepage right now?  I took a look at it and it looked interesting but I'm wondering if anyone has done it.  Since the potatoes aren't cooked I assume the starch gelatinizes OK with the hot water?  Is this a sparging nightmare?  Seems like it should be.

Offline nateo

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Re: Potato beer
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2012, 10:56:50 AM »
I'd probably do a regular cereal mash first. I don't think I'd trust just throwing raw potatoes into my mash. It does sound like something I'll have to try, though.
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Offline Slowbrew

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Re: Potato beer
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2012, 11:13:45 AM »
My first thought was "sounds like vodka". 

I have heard of people using "potato buds" type products rather than raw potatoes.  The same idea as flaked wheat.

I think you would have to precook the raw potatoes to get much out of them.  I don't see mash temps being able to do it alone.

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Offline kramerog

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Re: Potato beer
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2012, 11:56:54 AM »
You'll need to "mash" the potatoes first before mashing.  Make mashed potatoes first to gelatinize and make the potato starch accessible and then do a normal mash.  I would use white potatoes over red potatoes b/c red contains more amylopectin, IIRC.
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Offline nateo

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Re: Potato beer
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2012, 12:07:36 PM »
I wondered what kind of potato would work best. I was thinking Yukon Gold, but that's not based on anything but my gut feeling.
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Online morticaixavier

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Re: Potato beer
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2012, 12:40:48 PM »
I wondered what kind of potato would work best. I was thinking Yukon Gold, but that's not based on anything but my gut feeling.

I would think you would want a starchier potato. s good ol' russet burbank maybe. does make one think though, what about a purple potato.
when you boil those the water turns green, st. paddies day beer?
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Offline gmac

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Re: Potato beer
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2012, 01:43:10 PM »
I wondered what kind of potato would work best. I was thinking Yukon Gold, but that's not based on anything but my gut feeling.

I would think you would want a starchier potato. s good ol' russet burbank maybe. does make one think though, what about a purple potato.
when you boil those the water turns green, st. paddies day beer?
Morts right. Yukon Golds are waxy potatos that have a higher water content and less starch than mealy potatos such as the Russet. That's why russets make way better French fries. Purples fall into the mealy category.

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Potato beer
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2012, 02:08:29 PM »
Make mashed potatoes first
I would not want to put my mashed potatoes in beer.  Leave out the butter, cream, garlic, etc. ;)
Tom Schmidlin