Author Topic: Parti-gyle  (Read 4556 times)

Offline ethalacker

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 123
    • View Profile
Parti-gyle
« on: October 11, 2012, 06:28:57 AM »
Where do I start? I brew 10 gallon batches, so if I wanted to brew an IPA then add some roasted malt to the mash tun and then brew 5 gallons of stout could this be done?  I would I calculate the SG of the stout? 

So IPA grain bill is 12lbs of 2row, 8lbs of munich II, 6lbs of rye, 1lb of crystal 40 and 1lb of crystal 60.

Thanks for any help,

Eric
BoneHead Brewery
Mableton, GA

Offline hamiltont

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 972
  • Location: Somewhere in the Middle of Nebraska
    • View Profile
Re: Parti-gyle
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2012, 07:50:14 AM »
I gained a ton of information from this website...  Cheers!!!

http://morebeer.com/brewingtechniques/library/backissues/issue2.2/mosher.html#3
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

Offline kramerog

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 774
    • View Profile
Re: Parti-gyle
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2012, 08:04:18 AM »
I don't think an IPA is a good candidate for a parti-gyle.  The second runnings will have a very low gravity.  If you are planning on doing a double IPA then you are in the ballpark, but you might need some malt extract anyway. 

+1 on the BYO article. 

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Understanding_Efficiency has a table showing theoretical first wort gravity for different mash thicknesses. I think this table is more accurate than the ones in the BYO article although they do complement each other.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2012, 08:07:35 AM by kramerog »
Brewers of South Suburbia
Brixie's Brewers

Online morticaixavier

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 5656
  • Davis, CA
    • View Profile
    • The Best Artist in the WORLD!!!!!
Re: Parti-gyle
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2012, 08:22:04 AM »
Do you batch or fly sparge? If batch check out sean terrills partigyle simulator as a starting place. If fly check this article and associated tables out to help with the math
(which hamilton already linked to)
I don't know that you would get a stout perse with that recipe but you will get a dark beer and it will probably be tasty.

basically you do whatever mash you want for the IPA making sure you end up with your whole first runnings volume in the tun.
Toss the roasted grain in, stir and let it sit for 10-20 minutes and then run off again.

I only have the one burner so I usually do a mash out step, run off my first runnings into a bucket or spare kettle then do the second mash and boil that first because I want to stop conversion on the smaller beer ASAP. If you have two burners you can boil at the same time.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

Jonathan I Fuller

Offline Kaiser

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1797
  • Imperial Brewing Geek
    • View Profile
    • braukaiser.com
Re: Parti-gyle
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2012, 10:03:24 AM »
http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Understanding_Efficiency has a table showing theoretical first wort gravity for different mash thicknesses. I think this table is more accurate than the ones in the BYO article although they do complement each other.

Thanks for the plug. I also have this one: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Batch_Sparge_and_Party_Gyle_Simulator

Kai

Offline bluesman

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8677
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: Parti-gyle
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2012, 02:15:41 PM »
I'm planning a partigyle starting with a Barleywine then a session Brown to follow.  I like to start with a strong ale followed by a session style for this method to get the most bang for the buck.
Ron Price

Offline malzig

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 466
    • View Profile
Re: Parti-gyle
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2012, 08:19:17 AM »
http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Understanding_Efficiency has a table showing theoretical first wort gravity for different mash thicknesses. I think this table is more accurate than the ones in the BYO article although they do complement each other.
Thanks for the plug. I also have this one: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Batch_Sparge_and_Party_Gyle_Simulator

Kai
I've used Kai's Batch Sparge and Parti gyle Simulator many times and it is very useful for predicting your gravity for a parti gyle, if you know your conversion efficiency.  If you don't know your conversion efficiency, but know the sparge volumes and gravity from a previous batch, you can use it to reverse calculate your probable conversion efficiency, allowing you to use it predictively. 

On brewday, you can use the gravity of the first beer runnings to calculate the exact gravity of the second.  Since you know how much water is held up in the grain and the gravity of the wort, you can easily divide that gravity by the total volume of that wort and whatever water you wish to add.  Adjust that added volume until you calculate the gravity you want for the second beer, then add that volume to your tun.  The collected volume will be whatever you add, of course, so you might find you have to either make a smaller volume of beer than you intended or go with a lower gravity.  Make sure you adjust the hops accordingly.
I don't think an IPA is a good candidate for a parti-gyle.  The second runnings will have a very low gravity.  If you are planning on doing a double IPA then you are in the ballpark, but you might need some malt extract anyway.
I think this is probably true if you try to make 5 gallons with just the second runnings, but you might be able to get 3 gallons of a low gravity stout.

Another option is to make a gallon or two extra of the first wort and add it to 4-5 gallons of second runnings, to bump up the second running gravity.  This is basically how the Fuller's brewery makes their moderate gravity beers.

Offline ethalacker

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 123
    • View Profile
Re: Parti-gyle
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2012, 08:40:30 AM »
Thanks everybody!!!  This has all given me more to read and think about.

Eric
BoneHead Brewery
Mableton, GA

Offline tom

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1110
  • Denver, CO
    • View Profile
Re: Parti-gyle
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2012, 09:02:51 AM »
On brewday, you can use the gravity of the first beer runnings to calculate the exact gravity of the second.  Since you know how much water is held up in the grain and the gravity of the wort, you can easily divide that gravity by the total volume of that wort and whatever water you wish to add.  Adjust that added volume until you calculate the gravity you want for the second beer, then add that volume to your tun.   The collected volume will be whatever you add, of course, so you might find you have to either make a smaller volume of beer than you intended or go with a lower gravity.  Make sure you adjust the hops accordingly.
Briliant.  Never thought to do that.  Doh!
Brew on

Offline malzig

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 466
    • View Profile
Re: Parti-gyle
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2012, 06:51:26 PM »
Brilliant.  Never thought to do that.  Doh!
Like I said, I didn't come up with the idea, someone at Fuller's was doing it a long time ago.