Author Topic: Recipe help for WLP644  (Read 2845 times)

Offline saintpierre

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Recipe help for WLP644
« on: October 15, 2012, 12:14:48 PM »
I picked up a vial of WLP 644 Brettanomyces bruxellensis Trois I found in the 1/2 off bargain bin at my LHBS.  The vial is past its expairation date but I plan to make a lager size starter to grow the culture.

The WL website says this strain is traditionally used for 100% Brett fermentations and "produces a slightly tart beer with delicate characteristics of mango and pineapple."

I would like to do a 100% brett ferment but I don't have any experience with this yeast and have only made one sour beer to date so I am looking for guidance.  Ideas?
Mike St. Pierre
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Offline Mark G

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Re: Recipe help for WLP644
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2012, 02:27:36 PM »
Good timing on the question. I just put a saison on tap that was fermented with this strain. I'm not picking up a lot of fruitiness, maybe a hint of mango and pineapple. What I am getting though is a very spicy sensation on the tongue, with a low level of Brett funk ( just enough to know it's there, but not dominate).  The best part is that it fermented down to 1.003, so the finish is bone dry, yet I don't perceive the beer as thin. My grain bill is pilsner, spelt, and a bit of munich, mashed at 150, with an OG of 1.052. Hopped with Saaz and Styrian Goldings. Fermented in the upper 60s. It's a little slower than saccharomyces, but not by much. I kegged this after 4 weeks, but all activity was done after 2.
Mark Gres

Offline saintpierre

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Re: Recipe help for WLP644
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2012, 07:22:50 PM »
Do you think if you mashed higher the yeast might have struggled and produced more esters?  I get the feeling a higher more dextrinous wort is the norm based on articles I have read and other post in the forum.

A saison might be.  What about exploring the hoppy side of things?
Mike St. Pierre
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Recipe help for WLP644
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2012, 08:40:26 PM »
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline rjharper

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Re: Recipe help for WLP644
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2012, 09:13:59 PM »
A saison might be.  What about exploring the hoppy side of things?

Here's one idea:

http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2012/07/100-brett-trois-ipa-recipe.html

For what it's worth, the Brett IPAs I tried at GABF were a muddled mess

Offline Mark G

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Re: Re: Recipe help for WLP644
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2012, 05:42:09 AM »
Do you think if you mashed higher the yeast might have struggled and produced more esters?  I get the feeling a higher more dextrinous wort is the norm based on articles I have read and other post in the forum.

A saison might be.  What about exploring the hoppy side of things?

It's definitely possible that a higher mash temp could give you a different flavor profile out of the yeast. I would think other variables, like pitch rate, fermentation temp, and oxygenation, would probably make a bigger difference. You could go for higher hopping levels too, just be careful that you choose varieties that won't clash with the yeast characteristics. I feel that the Saaz and Styrian Goldings complement Saison characteristics.
Mark Gres

Offline troybinso

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Re: Recipe help for WLP644
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2012, 07:04:16 AM »
I have also just tapped a Saison made with this yeast. I split the batch between WL644 and WY3711. The 3711 half fermented down to 1.004 or so, and the Brett half finished at about 1.011. Fermented in my basement at about 68 degrees.

The taste of the Brett Saison is very fruity, with some pineapple and apricot notes. It is pretty tart, but not quite sour. Not a ton of the Brett "funk" that comes out when Brett is used in the secondary, but there is some barnyard, especially in the nose.

I adjusted my typical Saison recipe for this beer a little bit and added some unmalted grains ala Chad Yakobson in his recent Zymurgy article and Brewing Network interview.

Offline saintpierre

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Re: Recipe help for WLP644
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2012, 07:20:23 AM »
A saison might be.  What about exploring the hoppy side of things?

Here's one idea:

http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2012/07/100-brett-trois-ipa-recipe.html

For what it's worth, the Brett IPAs I tried at GABF were a muddled mess
This was exactly one of my concerns with lots of hops and the esters this yeast is said to produce.
Mike St. Pierre
Maine Ale & Libation Tasters (MALT)
BJCP Recognized
[719.4, 74.1] AR

Offline saintpierre

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Re: Recipe help for WLP644
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2012, 07:21:42 AM »
My grain bill is pilsner, spelt, and a bit of munich, mashed at 150, with an OG of 1.052. Hopped with Saaz and Styrian Goldings. Fermented in the upper 60s.
What percent of spelt did you use?
Mike St. Pierre
Maine Ale & Libation Tasters (MALT)
BJCP Recognized
[719.4, 74.1] AR

Offline Mark G

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Re: Re: Recipe help for WLP644
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2012, 07:26:17 AM »
My grain bill is pilsner, spelt, and a bit of munich, mashed at 150, with an OG of 1.052. Hopped with Saaz and Styrian Goldings. Fermented in the upper 60s.
What percent of spelt did you use?
25% malted spelt
Mark Gres