Author Topic: HERMS vs RIMS  (Read 12428 times)

Offline skepace

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HERMS vs RIMS
« on: October 29, 2012, 03:39:44 PM »
Building an all grain system.  Already have the three kegs bought for and a friend is going to cut openings in the top. 

But I am struggling with going with either HERMS or RIMS.  I would love honest feedback.

Thanks!

Offline yugamrap

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2012, 07:32:30 PM »
I don't do either, but I know brewers in our club who do both, and both methods can make great beer.  I think it's really a matter of preference.  HERMS is probably a little less prone to scorching or caramelization during the mash, but I think with good control there's probably little difference.

I'm assuming you're already brewing all-grain and are familiar with mashing techniques.  If that's not the case, I'd suggest starting simple with infusion step mashing or direct-fired step mashing to get familiar with those processes and how they affect wort production.
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Offline skepace

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2012, 08:32:28 PM »
Well I am building the setup right now.   Might get all of the valves put in me then try to produce my first batch. 

Offline jlo

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HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2012, 08:51:16 PM »
I've built and used both and always used ULWD electric elements in both set ups.  I'm back to the RIMS setup mainly because it was easier to set temperatures.  I can bring temps up faster as well with 3 elements.  During spargeing I run out of the MLT through the RIMS tube and into the Boil Kettle.  I've got 4500 watts in the RIMS tube and 5500 in the kettle, I'm easily at boiling at the end of the sparge.

I found that using the HLT to hold the HERMS coil it took longer to ramp temps up for Mashout.

Neither system produced better beer, they were roughly equivalent.

Offline skepace

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2012, 07:46:40 AM »
I was thinking of using propane burners.  I would have to brew in my garage with the winter coming in Colorado would make brewing rather cold but I really don't have space inside. 

Wouldn't the electric elements end up going bad at some point?  Cooking with gas is better than an electric stove.

Offline blatz

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2012, 08:18:38 AM »
I was thinking of using propane burners.  I would have to brew in my garage with the winter coming in Colorado would make brewing rather cold but I really don't have space inside. 

Wouldn't the electric elements end up going bad at some point?  Cooking with gas is better than an electric stove.

so, replace the elements when they eventually blow...not that expensive.

Plus electric brewing is about 95% efficient vs. propane which is only about 30% efficient, not to mention a lot more costly.
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Offline skepace

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2012, 08:20:56 AM »
I was thinking of using propane burners.  I would have to brew in my garage with the winter coming in Colorado would make brewing rather cold but I really don't have space inside. 

Wouldn't the electric elements end up going bad at some point?  Cooking with gas is better than an electric stove.

so, replace the elements when they eventually blow...not that expensive.

Plus electric brewing is about 95% efficient vs. propane which is only about 30% efficient, not to mention a lot more costly.

What about your electric bill?

Online morticaixavier

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2012, 08:22:47 AM »
I was thinking of using propane burners.  I would have to brew in my garage with the winter coming in Colorado would make brewing rather cold but I really don't have space inside. 

Wouldn't the electric elements end up going bad at some point?  Cooking with gas is better than an electric stove.

so, replace the elements when they eventually blow...not that expensive.

Plus electric brewing is about 95% efficient vs. propane which is only about 30% efficient, not to mention a lot more costly.

What about your electric bill?

propane ain't free either brother.
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Offline weithman5

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2012, 08:38:16 AM »
i love my little electric kettle.  i can brew in or out or switch in between.
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Offline skepace

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2012, 08:42:45 AM »
So if that's the case, would someone be able to give me an example of what the electric heater would look like?  Having some trouble finding it on morebeer.com.

I though propane was better, I guess with electric you can control the temp better?  Able to still do HERMS?

Offline blatz

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2012, 08:44:57 AM »
So if that's the case, would someone be able to give me an example of what the electric heater would look like?  Having some trouble finding it on morebeer.com.

I though propane was better, I guess with electric you can control the temp better?  Able to still do HERMS?

this is what I have http://www.theelectricbrewery.com/gallery- it is professional grade, but a lot can be done for significantly less.
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Offline skepace

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2012, 09:01:30 AM »
They look good!  I have to start a new list of parts.  :)

How long does it take to bring water up to a boil?

Offline weithman5

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2012, 10:11:13 AM »




This is my little electric kettle. 1500 watt element. 4gallon kettle.  works fine. no fancy electronics

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Offline jlo

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HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2012, 10:31:20 AM »
To me electric vs. gas is more of a lifestyle decision.  For me I spent approximately $10 on energy using gas and now spend $2 on electricity.  My system is not portable, and is mounted in my garage, if you look at theelectricbrewery.com it will give you an idea of how much you can spend to save $8 per batch.

If I were to do a gas build I might still look into a RIMS tube to keep the mash at temp.  That being said if you can stir the mash and are okay with vorloff you'll be fine.  Not as precise as keeping the mash liquid recirculating and occasionally hitting it with a bit of heat, but excellent beer is made with all types of systems.

If you we're going to use gas, I would shoot for the HERMS system.  My first HERMS coil in my HLT was a 50ft 1/2" stainless steel immersion chiller from Midwest Supplies. I got to play around with the process without punching holes in fancy kettles.  Kind of a simple HERMS setup MLT-->Pump-->IC in HLT-->hose floated on top of MLT.

A fairly simple way to try HERMS mashing out.

Offline skepace

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Re: HERMS vs RIMS
« Reply #14 on: October 30, 2012, 01:27:24 PM »

If you we're going to use gas, I would shoot for the HERMS system.  My first HERMS coil in my HLT was a 50ft 1/2" stainless steel immersion chiller from Midwest Supplies. I got to play around with the process without punching holes in fancy kettles.  Kind of a simple HERMS setup MLT-->Pump-->IC in HLT-->hose floated on top of MLT.

A fairly simple way to try HERMS mashing out.

Can you use HERMS on an electric?  The example of a HERMS setup is exactly what I am going for. 

I figured it is going to take me about 3 months till I can brew all grain.  I've got limited funds so taking my time and not stressing out the budget or my wife.