Author Topic: New to brewing  (Read 2461 times)

Offline euge

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #15 on: November 08, 2012, 09:20:46 AM »
So 99% of the fermentation has occurred. Congratulations on a successful ferment! Now let it sit and finish because it isn't done yet even if it doesn't drop any more points.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline rdbobonis

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2012, 09:22:09 AM »
Thank you.  So by Tuesday I should be good to bottle??  I hope.....

Offline euge

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2012, 09:23:49 AM »
Thank you.  So by Tuesday I should be good to bottle??  I hope.....

Sure. Give it a shot! ;D
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline rdbobonis

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2012, 12:34:34 PM »
OK, bottling today at some point...what is the best way to get the bottles ready?  I've heard of baking at 350 for 2 hours and of running in dish washer.....  :-\

Offline denny

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2012, 12:39:47 PM »
OK, bottling today at some point...what is the best way to get the bottles ready?  I've heard of baking at 350 for 2 hours and of running in dish washer.....  :-\

Assuming they're clean,just sanitize with some Starsan or iodophor.
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Offline euge

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2012, 12:40:16 PM »
OK, bottling today at some point...what is the best way to get the bottles ready?  I've heard of baking at 350 for 2 hours and of running in dish washer.....  :-\

I make sure mine are rinsed out really well then run them through the "sanitize" setting in the DW. Once they have cooled I just open the DW, set the bottling bucket on top and fill the bottles. The door catches any spillage (it will happen).

Or you could dunk them in starsan or iodophor if you don't trust the DW. I've done the oven method and always lost a couple bottles each time so don't recommend this approach.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2012, 03:35:28 PM »
OK, bottling today at some point...what is the best way to get the bottles ready?  I've heard of baking at 350 for 2 hours and of running in dish washer.....  :-\

I make sure mine are rinsed out really well then run them through the "sanitize" setting in the DW. Once they have cooled I just open the DW, set the bottling bucket on top and fill the bottles. The door catches any spillage (it will happen).

Or you could dunk them in starsan or iodophor if you don't trust the DW. I've done the oven method and always lost a couple bottles each time so don't recommend this approach.

I haven't bottled a whole batch in a while but the last two or three times I did the oven method and I liked it. yes you lose a couple but I sort of consider that QC. If it broke from heating and cooling there was a flaw in the glass and I don't want my beer in it anyway. In fact I have found the bubble that caused the break in all three bottles that broke. It probably wouldn't have broke at 2 atmospheres but...

I always include 5 or 6 more bottles than I think I will need for this reason when useing the oven. I like being able to put them in the oven the night before and then pull them out and fill in the morning.

I never had a problem with idophor either though so...

**EDIT** Wow! I said over instead of oven in EVERY case. wasn't even autocorrect.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2012, 04:33:40 PM by morticaixavier »
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Offline anje

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2012, 04:09:29 PM »
Might not be something you can do this time, but if your bottles are clean, I really like using a wine sulfiter to spray Star-san inside the bottles. Then just put them on a bottle tree (also spritzed down with Star-san) to drip out the excess. Dunk your caps in some sanitizer solution, too (I keep them in a lingerie laundry bag to keep them together), and you're all set.

I don't use my dishwasher because my water is amazingly hard and therefore I really need to have a rinse aid in there. Rinse agents like Jet Wash aren't conducive to having a good head on your beer.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2012, 04:11:13 PM by anje »
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Offline rdbobonis

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #23 on: November 14, 2012, 01:40:03 PM »
Thanks all!!  Now 2 weeks until I can drink them....

Offline euge

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #24 on: November 14, 2012, 04:33:53 PM »
Thanks all!!  Now 2 weeks until I can drink them....

Congrats!

Try one on Sunday or Monday to see how the carbonation progresses. Some folks bottle one beer in a 20oz soda bottle as a control. Just squeeze all the head-space's air out, tighten the top and you can watch it swell.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Online garc_mall

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2012, 10:02:09 AM »
I have found that my 12oz bottles become carbonated quicker than bombers. If I have a 12oz bottle with a low gravity beer, I can get fully carbed beer within a week. This was most important when I was a new brewer and didn't have the patience to wait.
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Offline euge

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2012, 11:04:07 AM »
I have found in general- much as in the main fermentation it is done within 3 days unless it is too cold. This can vary depending on factors but it's good to wait at least a week. I've found that if very little yeast gets into the bottling bucket- say after crashing or crashing a secondary or attempts to strip the yeast it will take much longer. Much longer.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline rdbobonis

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #27 on: November 27, 2012, 04:08:13 PM »
OK beer is done, came out OK...but have a question....

Is there supposed to be stuff at the bottom of the bottles?? :-\

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #28 on: November 27, 2012, 04:19:18 PM »
OK beer is done, came out OK...but have a question....

Is there supposed to be stuff at the bottom of the bottles?? :-\

yes. there should be a thin layer of whiteish/tannish yeast sediment. If you pour carefully you should be able to leave most of it behind with minimal beer loss. also if you chill the bottles for a while before pouring it will become more dense and compacted and will be easier to leave behind.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

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Offline HydraulicSammich

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #29 on: November 27, 2012, 04:20:55 PM »
Oh ya, you have done well.  Got yeast in the bottom of the bottle as should be.  Crack one and give it a try and let us know.  Congrats!
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