Author Topic: Kegging newbie question.  (Read 1320 times)

Offline LouBru

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Kegging newbie question.
« on: November 14, 2012, 09:24:25 AM »
Hey gang,
Just kegged for first time. Got a crappy regulator and first keg cap had leak in bleed valve. Left on 10 psi over night and now tank is 25% full. Kind of pissed.

1.  What's the best way to leek test a used keg?
2. Once I get to my dispensing psi, 6-9 psi, do I leave co2 on at that point until keg is empty? Or do I turn off co2 until I need to pour a pint?

Thanks all.  Happy I'm kegging now but want to make sure I get this right.

Lou
Primary- SS minow brown
Secondary- Drumpkin dark rum pumpkin ale.
Secondary- Brugse Tripel
Keg Holiday spiced Red
Bottle- Drumpkin / Dude RyePa / Oakwood bourbon porter/ Dark Cherry Van bourbon porter

Online euge

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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2012, 09:30:16 AM »
Get a spray bottle filled with starsan or soapy water and spray all connections and places that there could be a leak. It will obviously show signs of bubbling if there is one or more leaks.

I just hook up the tank periodically when the flow starts to diminish. I don't leave it hooked to the kegs all the time. Works for me maybe not others. The only leaks I get are from the kegs themselves. Then I can address the issue once I spot it.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline LouBru

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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2012, 09:32:38 AM »
So once you've carved the beer and are happy with taste etc,  you back off the Co2 until you need to pour. Ok, thanks

Lou
Primary- SS minow brown
Secondary- Drumpkin dark rum pumpkin ale.
Secondary- Brugse Tripel
Keg Holiday spiced Red
Bottle- Drumpkin / Dude RyePa / Oakwood bourbon porter/ Dark Cherry Van bourbon porter

Offline thebigbaker

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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2012, 09:40:08 AM »
+1 for the spray bottle of star san. 

If it's a used keg, try replacing all of your gaskets, which is cheap and easy to do.  You can also replace your bleed valve cheaply too.  I've also gotten a few extra lids for about $12. Also, try some keg lube, which will help give you a tight seal on your lids and posts.  Just put some on a paper towel and spread some on your gaskets.

I've always just left my CO2 on and set to 10-12 psi.  I could be wrong, but I believe that once the CO2 has filled the keg and carbed the beer, it only pushes CO2 when you create extra space in the keg by dispensing the beer.  Could be wrong and would be interesting to see if there is any difference with leaving it on or taking it off. 
Jeremy Baker

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Offline Mark G

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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2012, 10:07:03 AM »
I leave the CO2 on the whole time. Otherwise you could end up with your beer losing some carbonation. The regulator only allows more CO2 to flow if the pressure drops, like when dispensing or carbing.
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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2012, 10:19:34 AM »
I leave the CO2 on the whole time. Otherwise you could end up with your beer losing some carbonation.

Only if you have a leak  :) , but yes if there are no leaks the CO2 can be left on.
 
To check for slow leaks, I charge the system (without beer) with CO2 at 10psi. Then turn the tank off and leave it for a day. Day or two later check the regulator gauges - they should be at the same pressures if there are no leaks. When I first set up my kegorator, the gauges would read zero after a few hours until I got everything tightened up. Keg lube is my friend - eventually I put it on EVERY connection. It really helped.
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Offline LouBru

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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2012, 10:32:29 AM »
Everyone,
Awesome responses. Thanks.  I already purchased new gaskets and had replaced them.  Purchased the lube and used it on every connection also. Charged keg at 10psi and let it sit.  The obvious drop was from the leek. That's the only thing I didn't change was the bleed valve which I can grab cheap as someone mentioned.

Basically, I am more right track but it helps to have you all clarify. Thanks again and cheers.

Lou
Primary- SS minow brown
Secondary- Drumpkin dark rum pumpkin ale.
Secondary- Brugse Tripel
Keg Holiday spiced Red
Bottle- Drumpkin / Dude RyePa / Oakwood bourbon porter/ Dark Cherry Van bourbon porter

Offline bluesman

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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2012, 10:48:55 AM »

To check for slow leaks, I charge the system (without beer) with CO2 at 10psi. Then turn the tank off and leave it for a day. Day or two later check the regulator gauges - they should be at the same pressures if there are no leaks. When I first set up my kegorator, the gauges would read zero after a few hours until I got everything tightened up. Keg lube is my friend - eventually I put it on EVERY connection. It really helped.

+1

After cleaning the keg from a previous use, I like to pressurize the keg filled with a quart of starsan to sanitize, and then check the keg pressure after several days. If the keg holds pressure I'll fill it, but always spray some starsan around the lid and posts to check for leaks after filling and pressurizing as a precautionary measure.
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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2012, 10:57:44 AM »

To check for slow leaks, I charge the system (without beer) with CO2 at 10psi. Then turn the tank off and leave it for a day. Day or two later check the regulator gauges - they should be at the same pressures if there are no leaks. When I first set up my kegorator, the gauges would read zero after a few hours until I got everything tightened up. Keg lube is my friend - eventually I put it on EVERY connection. It really helped.

+1

After cleaning the keg from a previous use, I like to pressurize the keg filled with a quart of starsan to sanitize, and then check the keg pressure after several days. If the keg holds pressure I'll fill it, but always spray some starsan around the lid and posts to check for leaks after filling and pressurizing as a precautionary measure.

I clean and sanitize my kegs in batches of 4 - 6 at a time.  I close them up and pressurize each keg, check for leaks and then put them in my storage cabinet.  If they still have pressure in them when I need to fill them I know I'm good to go.  It saves me a couple of steps on kegging days.

Paul
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Offline mmitchem

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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2012, 11:06:45 AM »
I get really good seal when I use the old Keg Lube. Keeps the rubber conditioned and gives em a little more life. Definitely pressurize, leave the keg, check it for a drop. Use the star san to test seals as well. But the keg lube is good stuff IMO for keeping those seals conditioned over time.
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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2012, 11:10:46 AM »
I use olive oil.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline beerlord

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Re: Kegging newbie question.
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2012, 01:22:20 PM »
Keep in mind that if your tank is in the kegerator, it will show as less full which confused me at first. But, like others have said, before you keg, charge the keg to about 30 psi and check for leaks. Grease the rings and keep the poppets clean and you should be golden.