Author Topic: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees  (Read 6014 times)

Offline tonyp

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #30 on: July 19, 2013, 12:18:15 PM »
I got in touch with my local zoning office and since I'm zoned rural and on a main road I might be able to get a variance to run a limited brewery on site. He told me to write up a description of intended use (and gave me a hint that if I add provisions for growing hops/grain it would help with approval).

We'll see how it goes...
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Offline narvin

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #31 on: July 19, 2013, 12:53:03 PM »

Lots of states help ag businesses out, though I think a state supporting farm breweries is sort of dumb given that you'd need to malt any grain you grow and few areas are great for hops. It doesn't seem really reasonable. And I'd rather see them just support small breweries.

You can use almost any raw grain as an adjunct.  That's the epitome of farmhouse brewing!
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Offline anthony

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #32 on: July 19, 2013, 02:05:46 PM »
As pervasive as hops are, I think all areas could be decent for them, specific regions just need more local varietal development (i.e. university powered research and development)

Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #33 on: July 19, 2013, 04:21:46 PM »
you still have to deal with the feds and pay a bond but that goes towards your taxes due them anyway.

The bond is held as collateral against the taxes on future production. You only get it back if you go out of business.
You just can buy a bond insurance and you do not get anything back.
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Offline anthony

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #34 on: July 19, 2013, 10:07:21 PM »
+1 on this because you end up paying like 1/10th of what the actual bond would cost.

Online mtnrockhopper

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #35 on: July 21, 2013, 06:24:53 AM »

Lots of states help ag businesses out, though I think a state supporting farm breweries is sort of dumb given that you'd need to malt any grain you grow and few areas are great for hops. It doesn't seem really reasonable. And I'd rather see them just support small breweries.

You can use almost any raw grain as an adjunct.  That's the epitome of farmhouse brewing!
That's what I mean though. You can have a farm that supplies adjuncts, fruits, etc no problem. But 'farm brewery' implies a brewery that grows the majority of its ingredients - something that's fairly difficult in reality. Though, in reality, many small wineries also grow only a portion of their grapes.
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Offline narvin

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #36 on: July 21, 2013, 07:41:19 AM »
The license here only says, "The beer to be sold and delivered under paragraph (2) of this subsection shall be manufactured with an ingredient from a Maryland agricultural product, including hops, grain, and fruit, produced on the licensed farm."  That doesn't preclude using wheat or another grain as 30% of the grist.  As long as you aren't violating the spirit of the law by, say, adding one farm grown hop cone per batch, it seems like it should be fine.
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