General Category > Other Fermentables

First Mead

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brown stout:

--- Quote from: punatic on November 21, 2012, 01:12:07 AM ---Avoid Barkshack Ginger Mead.  Nasty! (IMHO).  I would suggest trying some kind of a fruit mead.  Fruit in the mead lends nutrients and stability.  Most of all read Ken Schramm's book The Complete Meadmaker.

Please tell us more about the antique mead bottles you found.

--- End quote ---


The mead bottles that I have were dug up from privy's in Baltimore. ( Circa 1840-1860 pits)   One example that I have is a very heavy( 2.12 lb) grey salt glaze stoneware bottle that measures 10" tall.  Wm. Russell is impressed on one side.  William Russell was a bottler that bottled beer, mead, and soda.  He was located at 22 Light Street.  He was in business from 1847-1861.

Thanks,

Marc

svejk:
As you're researching what type of mead to make, I recommend that you familiarize yourself with no-boil musts, staggered nutrient additions, aeration and degassing of meads.  Meads are very easy on day 1, but the treatment of fermentation is very different from what you do for typical beers.  I think it is common for first meads to be under attenuated because the must is low in nutrients and the CO2 needs to be driven out of the must to allow the yeast to finish the job.

brown stout:

--- Quote from: svejk on November 25, 2012, 06:59:12 PM ---As you're researching what type of mead to make, I recommend that you familiarize yourself with no-boil musts, staggered nutrient additions, aeration and degassing of meads.  Meads are very easy on day 1, but the treatment of fermentation is very different from what you do for typical beers.  I think it is common for first meads to be under attenuated because the must is low in nutrients and the CO2 needs to be driven out of the must to allow the yeast to finish the job.

--- End quote ---


Thanks for the information.  This will help me out.

punatic:

--- Quote from: svejk on November 25, 2012, 06:59:12 PM ---I think it is common for first meads to be under attenuated because the must is low in nutrients and the CO2 needs to be driven out of the must to allow the yeast to finish the job.

--- End quote ---
 

I make "under attenuated" meads on purpose, regularly.  I like low alcohol sweet meads.  Back-sweetening does not give the same flavor profile.  Never tried driving out the carbon dioxide.  Seems like taking a chance on making a sherry-like mead by introducing oxygen at the wrong time.

guido:

--- Quote from: punatic on November 26, 2012, 11:12:19 PM ---
--- Quote from: svejk on November 25, 2012, 06:59:12 PM ---I think it is common for first meads to be under attenuated because the must is low in nutrients and the CO2 needs to be driven out of the must to allow the yeast to finish the job.

--- End quote ---
 

I make "under attenuated" meads on purpose, regularly.  I like low alcohol sweet meads.  Back-sweetening does not give the same flavor profile.  Never tried driving out the carbon dioxide.  Seems like taking a chance on making a sherry-like mead by introducing oxygen at the wrong time.

--- End quote ---

Staggered nutrient additions and de-gassing have done wonders for my meads.  Full attenuation, yet they retain a certain "sweetness," even though the gravity is low.  De-gassing won't introduce any off flavors as long as it's done during the first few days of primary fermentation.  I have a wand that I hook up to a power drill and let 'er fly.  Trick is you need a large 7.9 gallon bucket during this time.  The foam will be incredible and you might lose some must otherwise.  Once fermentation slows, I transfer to a carboy.  There's an excellent article by Steve Piatz called "Making Mead the Easy Way."  I'm sure you could find it on Google.  I highly recommend the article.

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