Author Topic: disposing of yeast cake  (Read 4186 times)

Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2012, 06:22:05 PM »
My understanding is that yeast competes with beneficial bacteria for oxygen is septic systems. This is why municipalities do not want live yeast in their water treatment plants.

I give the yeast nice warm bath over 120F for 30 min and down the drain they go.
Composting is a fine option.
I already had house drain plugged with yeast.
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Offline majorvices

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disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2012, 07:48:41 PM »
My understanding is that yeast competes with beneficial bacteria for oxygen is septic systems. This is why municipalities do not want live yeast in their water treatment plants.


Now that you mention it I remember this as well. I think it is BS, but I remember hearing it. ;)

Most likely yeast in the septic system just dies or becomes dormant. I doubt there is much for it to consume since it has evolved to ferment maltose.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2012, 08:19:19 PM »
I dump plenty of yeast into our septic tank, and I've never had the guy pumping it out say there seemed like there was anything wrong or odd with our tank given the time between pumpings.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline denny

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Re: disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2012, 09:42:28 AM »
If you have a septic system it should actually be beneficial for it. RidX ready to go! ;)

Could be, but it certainly doesn't hurt!
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Offline tubercle

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Re: disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2012, 08:39:02 PM »
....Sending the yeast down a curb drain may be a problem. Any newer city has separate storm and sanitary sewers. Street storm drains go to the nearest river, and a yeast slurry would be an un-natural organic load, reduce water quality, and cause areal stench if not flushed by a decent rainstorm.

A quart of yeast slurry in a river will cause "an un-natural organic load, reduce water quality"?

Really?

Kind of like spitting in the ocean.
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Offline corkybstewart

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Re: disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #20 on: November 28, 2012, 10:14:11 AM »
Sometimes mine goes onto the compost heap, sometimes onto the "lawn", sometimes into the septic tank depending on which fermentor I'm using.  If it's buckets it goes in the septic tank, carboys onto the lawn and the conical gets drained into buckets for the compost pile
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Online morticaixavier

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Re: disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #21 on: November 28, 2012, 12:04:37 PM »
....Sending the yeast down a curb drain may be a problem. Any newer city has separate storm and sanitary sewers. Street storm drains go to the nearest river, and a yeast slurry would be an un-natural organic load, reduce water quality, and cause areal stench if not flushed by a decent rainstorm.

A quart of yeast slurry in a river will cause "an un-natural organic load, reduce water quality"?

Really?

Kind of like spitting in the ocean.

gotta say this argument doesn't hold water. it's not just 1 qt of yeast. it's 1 quart of yeast * 500K homebrewers in america (okay not all of them are dumping yeast in the storm drain, and not all of them that do live in the same place, but you get the idea)

the spitting in the ocean argument is exactly the same that leads to dumping radioactive waste in the ocean because hey what's a few thousand barrells of toxic gunk in the whole ocean?

Not saying there is an issue with disposing of the yeast cake in the storm drain but...
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #22 on: November 28, 2012, 09:35:51 PM »
gotta say this argument doesn't hold water.
I get what you're saying, but there is a huge difference between dumping something that is food and will degrade quickly, and something that is toxic and has a half-life of 24,000 years.  Huge difference.  And I know you know that.

Yes, the "spitting in the ocean" argument is a bad one in a lot of instances.  I don't think it is in this one, considering the volume of yeast on a homebrew scale, number of homebrewers who dump yeast outside, how frequently they dump yeast, geographic distances between them, and the fact that it will readily be healthy food for other organisms.  Crank up any of those factors and it might be bad.
Tom Schmidlin

Online morticaixavier

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Re: disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2012, 11:34:19 PM »
gotta say this argument doesn't hold water.
I get what you're saying, but there is a huge difference between dumping something that is food and will degrade quickly, and something that is toxic and has a half-life of 24,000 years.  Huge difference.  And I know you know that.

Yes, the "spitting in the ocean" argument is a bad one in a lot of instances.  I don't think it is in this one, considering the volume of yeast on a homebrew scale, number of homebrewers who dump yeast outside, how frequently they dump yeast, geographic distances between them, and the fact that it will readily be healthy food for other organisms.  Crank up any of those factors and it might be bad.

If I have told myself once, I have told myself a million times. 'Don't be hyperbolic'

point taken and fully conceded. I dump my yeast in the compost or on the lawn and it I am sure washed into local water ways and/or sewers. but mostly eaten by other life forms
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2012, 01:58:44 AM »
If I have told myself once, I have told myself a million times. 'Don't be hyperbolic'
And I've told you a billion times, stop exaggerating. ;D
Tom Schmidlin

Offline tubercle

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Re: disposing of yeast cake
« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2012, 06:14:53 AM »
We keep fogetting that besides coming in neat little packages, yeast exist in nature. There is probably more yeast washed down a storm drain naturally in a day during a rain storm than all of us could dump in a year.
Sweet Caroline where the Sun rises over the deep blue sea and sets somewhere beyond Tennessee