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yeast starter

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davidgzach:
There are definitely times when you do not want to pitch the entire starter, especially when making lagers.  You make a lager starter at room temp, so the "beer" is filled with esters and sulphur.  It's not as much of an issue when making ales so if you want to figure it in to your recipe, pitching the entire starter keeps the yeast from going dormant. 

However, I think most let the starter finish out and place in the fridge until brew day.  The yeast typically falls out in a day, but I find that waiting 2-3 days allows for a more compact yeast cake.  This makes it easier to decant. 

thebigbaker:
I do three gallon batches, so I only do starters for big beers.  I can't taste a difference between when I decant and when I don't w/ my larger ABV beers.  Now when I start doing 5 gallon batches, I'll be doing starters for every beer and probably decant more often if it makes a difference.

yso191:
And this is why I am a member of the AHA and participate in this forum.  You all are such a wealth of info.  Thank you.  I have not had any trouble with fermentation even with the 1.093 IPA I just brewed, but you all make good points and I am just a bit of a perfectionist.  I'll start it sooner, refrigerate, and decant.  Especially good to know about the lager issue as I am brewing a Baltic Porter with lager yeast next.

Steve

yso191:
So check my thinking...

I am going to brew five gallons of Baltic Porter with an OG of 1.065 using Wyeast's 2124 lager yeast.

My limitations are that I have one stir plate and two, 2 liter flasks.

For my previous ales I have made a 1 liter starter wort to which I add the yeast packet.  My thinking is to start the same with a 1 liter wort, leave it on the stir plate for 3 days, in the fridge for 2 then decant.  Then make a 1.5 liter wort and combine that with the 1st starter (I'm assuming this will get me close to 2 liters total which makes me a bit nervous).  Then let the second step for for 3 days, 2 days in the fridge, decant and pitch into the oxygenated Baltic Porter wort.  At each step and in the boil kettle I will use the appropriate amount of yeast nutrient.

Obviously this would be a lot better/easier if I had a second stir plate or a bigger flask, but is there an easier or better way?

Steve

morticaixavier:

--- Quote from: yso191 on December 13, 2012, 04:19:27 PM ---So check my thinking...

I am going to brew five gallons of Baltic Porter with an OG of 1.065 using Wyeast's 2124 lager yeast.

My limitations are that I have one stir plate and two, 2 liter flasks.

For my previous ales I have made a 1 liter starter wort to which I add the yeast packet.  My thinking is to start the same with a 1 liter wort, leave it on the stir plate for 3 days, in the fridge for 2 then decant.  Then make a 1.5 liter wort and combine that with the 1st starter (I'm assuming this will get me close to 2 liters total which makes me a bit nervous).  Then let the second step for for 3 days, 2 days in the fridge, decant and pitch into the oxygenated Baltic Porter wort.  At each step and in the boil kettle I will use the appropriate amount of yeast nutrient.

Obviously this would be a lot better/easier if I had a second stir plate or a bigger flask, but is there an easier or better way?

Steve

--- End quote ---

not sure about the math off the top of my head but check this site out. It's great for multistep starters which is an area the mrmalty does not so do well.

http://yeastcalc.com/

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