Author Topic: Boiling starters in a flask  (Read 7366 times)

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Boiling starters in a flask
« Reply #45 on: January 02, 2013, 09:31:45 AM »
Hasn't yet...
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Boiling starters in a flask
« Reply #46 on: January 02, 2013, 10:19:51 AM »
Good to know about the stir bar.  I always added it right after I took the starter off the boil.  Got my finger steamed a couple of times doing this and if I do not add Fermcap, I can get a volcano.

I've been looking around the internet more on this and it seems that if you have a glass or ceramic electric stove it is not an issue.  It becomes a problem when you put the flask directly on the electric heating coils.  My glass top electric seems to distribute the heat quite well and as I have said, no problems thus far.

However, I don't want boiling wort all over the kitchen as my wife will kill me.  Thoughts on glass/ceramic stove tops versus directly on the element?

Dave
Dave Zach

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Boiling starters in a flask
« Reply #47 on: January 02, 2013, 10:23:15 AM »
Good to know about the stir bar.  I always added it right after I took the starter off the boil.  Got my finger steamed a couple of times doing this and if I do not add Fermcap, I can get a volcano.

Just to be clear, I haven't boiled the stir bar on the stove where it might be getting heated directly from the flame.

I boil water and pour it into the flask which has the stir bar in it.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Boiling starters in a flask
« Reply #48 on: January 02, 2013, 10:23:56 AM »
Stir bars are usually teflon coated.  According to wikipedia, teflon has a melting point of 621F.  It will be fine in the liquid.
Tom Schmidlin