Author Topic: Slowed Fermentation  (Read 927 times)

Offline bclosson

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Slowed Fermentation
« on: December 18, 2012, 01:35:40 PM »
Help - fermentation at day 9 seems to have stopped.  Took 2 readings in 2 days and stuck at 1.02.
Beggining was 1.052.  Should I rack to secondary, stir, leave alone???  Some small bubbles on top but everything seems to have certainly settled down.  Ending gravity supposed to be 1.01-1.012

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Slowed Fermentation
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2012, 01:43:22 PM »
Don't stir!  What temperature at you fermenting at and what yeast are you using?  Let's start there.  Also what type of beer is it and extract or all-grain?

Dave
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Offline bclosson

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Re: Slowed Fermentation
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2012, 01:47:12 PM »
English Brown Ale - Caribou Slobber - extract
65-66 degrees - upped the temp in room today
dry Danstar Windsor
This is my 2nd patch ever so be patient!!

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Slowed Fermentation
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2012, 01:56:34 PM »
English Brown Ale - Caribou Slobber - extract
65-66 degrees - upped the temp in room today
dry Danstar Windsor
This is my 2nd patch ever so be patient!!

No worries.  That is what the forum is for, to help out.

I'm guessing the yeast was the packet with the kit?  Did you rehydrate? 

Try to get it up to 68F-70F for a couple of days and give it a gentle swirl.  That should get you a few more points.  If not, it may be worth it to get another packet of yeast.  Also, make sure your hydrometer is calibrated.

Dave
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Offline bclosson

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Re: Slowed Fermentation
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2012, 02:02:03 PM »
Thansk for your time -
Bought yeast at local brewery store.  Got recipe off internet and bought locally
Not sure how to rehydrate or to calibrate hydrometer

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Slowed Fermentation
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2012, 02:19:31 PM »
Thansk for your time -
Bought yeast at local brewery store.  Got recipe off internet and bought locally
Not sure how to rehydrate or to calibrate hydrometer

OK, no big deal there.  Thought it may have been a kit. 

You can search the web and the forum for rehydrating dry yeast and calibrating.  Very easy.

Give it a couple of days at 68F-70F. 

Dave
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Slowed Fermentation
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2012, 02:27:55 PM »
Windsor is a low attenuating yeast.  You ought to be able to get a little bit lower but maybe not down to 1.012.

That said, give it time and some warmth and see what happens.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Slowed Fermentation
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2012, 02:36:52 PM »
Was this an extract beer?  Depending on the manufacturer of the extract, it can have a lot of unfermentable sugars that will never let your beer get down to less than about 1.018.  Next time you could try a different extract manufacturer or kit maker.  For this batch, I'd consider throwing in a pound of sugar to jack up the alcohol and thin the beer out a bit.  Regular old white table sugar is 100% fermentable so it will bring the alcohol up to where it needs to be for the style, although yes it could dilute the flavors somewhat since it is essentially flavorless.  You could add a pound of honey or something like that instead if you wish.  Not saying that you have to do this, but it is worth thinking about, because if the fermentation quits at a gravity of 1.020, then your alcohol is only at.... about 4%... which I suppose isn't too bad.  Up to you.
Dave

"This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption. Let us give praise to our Maker, and glory to His bounty, by learning about... BEER!" - Friar Tuck (Robin Hood - Prince of Thieves)

Offline bclosson

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Re: Slowed Fermentation
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2012, 03:57:58 PM »
I plugged in the heat belt I have and air lock started to bubble once every couple minutes
Temp on bucket now says 70 deg. I assume that means fermentation has begun again?
Another ? - bottled my 1st batch Sunday. How warm do bottles need to be to carbonate?

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Slowed Fermentation
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2012, 03:59:19 PM »
I plugged in the heat belt I have and air lock started to bubble once every couple minutes
Temp on bucket now says 70 deg. I assume that means fermentation has begun again?
Another ? - bottled my 1st batch Sunday. How warm do bottles need to be to carbonate?

Room temp. Warmer is faster, but stay within reason (ie. don't put them on the heat register or radiator).

I always kept them in my basement at mid-60s.

EDIT:  Bubbles don't necessarily mean you're fermenting. As the beer warms it will release CO2 from suspension. Hopefully, you'll get a small kraesun. Or however you spell that.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2012, 04:01:02 PM by Joe Sr. »
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Slowed Fermentation
« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2012, 04:03:12 PM »
I plugged in the heat belt I have and air lock started to bubble once every couple minutes
Temp on bucket now says 70 deg. I assume that means fermentation has begun again?
Another ? - bottled my 1st batch Sunday. How warm do bottles need to be to carbonate?

Sweet!  Yep, you roused them from their slumber.

I keep my bottles at 68F.

Dave
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