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Water Check - not Happy with "Pale Ale" profile

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mabrungard:

--- Quote from: hopfenundmalz on January 01, 2013, 10:51:18 AM ---
--- Quote from: blatz on January 01, 2013, 09:56:14 AM ---I am tempted to try Stone's water profile (with adjustments for pH if necessary) as stated in Koch's book:

30ppm Ca
12ppm Mg
85ppm Sulfate
40ppm Sodium

The low Ca and high Na are scary though.

--- End quote ---

When we toured Stone, the guide said that the tap water was blended with RO, 50:50. I am too lazy to look up the water profile for that part of the country, but they get a fair amount from the Colorado River, which is full of minerals. The profile above may be what they have in the HLT.

There was also a shipping pallet stacked high with a 50 Lb bags of Gypsum and Calcium Chloride. I assume they use those minerals to adjust for the beer they are brewing.


--- End quote ---

40 ppm sodium is not that high.  Don't worry too much about that.

The Colorado River water quality is not too good for brewing.  Ask any Las Vegan or Los Angeleno.  Diluting with RO is a reasonable alternative. 

Hmm??? I have no idea what a brewer would do with bags of minerals!  ;-)

hopfenundmalz:

--- Quote from: mabrungard on January 01, 2013, 11:06:42 AM ---
--- Quote from: hopfenundmalz on January 01, 2013, 10:51:18 AM ---
--- Quote from: blatz on January 01, 2013, 09:56:14 AM ---I am tempted to try Stone's water profile (with adjustments for pH if necessary) as stated in Koch's book:

30ppm Ca
12ppm Mg
85ppm Sulfate
40ppm Sodium

The low Ca and high Na are scary though.

--- End quote ---

When we toured Stone, the guide said that the tap water was blended with RO, 50:50. I am too lazy to look up the water profile for that part of the country, but they get a fair amount from the Colorado River, which is full of minerals. The profile above may be what they have in the HLT.

There was also a shipping pallet stacked high with a 50 Lb bags of Gypsum and Calcium Chloride. I assume they use those minerals to adjust for the beer they are brewing.


--- End quote ---

40 ppm sodium is not that high.  Don't worry too much about that.

The Colorado River water quality is not too good for brewing.  Ask any Las Vegan or Los Angeleno.  Diluting with RO is a reasonable alternative. 

Hmm??? I have no idea what a brewer would do with bags of minerals!  ;-)

--- End quote ---

Having bathed in Colorado river water for 15 days once, I can say it is wet in a grimy way. The drinking water was run through a .2 micron filter, IIRC. Not good for bathing and was not the best drinking water either.

The Colorado picks up minerals through the Red Rock country, as it goes through the Paradox basin (salt), Gypsum from deposits in Canyonlands NP, and of course the Red Rock gives it the calcium carbonate that binds the sandstone together. There is also a little radioactive run off - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moab_uranium_mill_tailings_pile



beersk:
I can tell that Stone's water is higher in sodium, but also thought the sulfate would be higher. I think the thing my IPA's have been missing is sulfate...I tend to not go much above 100ppm. I should actually try 150-200ppm in a recipe I know and see if it makes the hops "pop" a little more. Thoughts?

reverseapachemaster:

--- Quote from: mabrungard on January 01, 2013, 11:06:42 AM ---
The Colorado River water quality is not too good for brewing.  Ask any Las Vegan or Los Angeleno.  Diluting with RO is a reasonable alternative. 

--- End quote ---

Really? I remember the last time or two I was in Vegas I tasted the water and thought it actually had a decent enough taste that it could be used for brewing, unlike the hard and heavily chlorinated water here in Dallas.

hopfenundmalz:

--- Quote from: reverseapachemaster on January 03, 2013, 07:28:38 AM ---
--- Quote from: mabrungard on January 01, 2013, 11:06:42 AM ---
The Colorado River water quality is not too good for brewing.  Ask any Las Vegan or Los Angeleno.  Diluting with RO is a reasonable alternative. 

--- End quote ---

Really? I remember the last time or two I was in Vegas I tasted the water and thought it actually had a decent enough taste that it could be used for brewing, unlike the hard and heavily chlorinated water here in Dallas.

--- End quote ---

LV has a hardness of 288, which is high-ish. The alkalinity, Na, Cl and SO4 would be more concerns for some beers.
http://www.lvvwd.com/assets/pdf/wq_summary_lvvwd.pdf

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