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Banjo Burner Issue...

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Pawtucket Patriot:

--- Quote from: gymrat on December 26, 2012, 07:50:02 AM ---One other thing to look at would be how full is your propane bottle?

--- End quote ---

I recently switched over to a newly filled one. :-\

Wesbrau:
This could just be a perspective thing, but from the picture, it looks like there is no where for your exhaust gas to go.  The diamond in the frame that is supporting the kettle and surrounding the burner appears as though it would trap a lot of the exhaust gas (CO2, etc.) between the frame and your kettle bottom.  If that exhaust gas cannot escape, it could then choke your flame.  Or it wouldn't combust until it escaped around the frame.

You could try setting your burner off to one side to create a gap between your frame and your kettle bottom and see if that helps.

tom:
Or lower the burner guard a couple of inches.

Pawtucket Patriot:

--- Quote from: Wesbrau on December 26, 2012, 01:17:22 PM ---This could just be a perspective thing, but from the picture, it looks like there is no where for your exhaust gas to go.  The diamond in the frame that is supporting the kettle and surrounding the burner appears as though it would trap a lot of the exhaust gas (CO2, etc.) between the frame and your kettle bottom.  If that exhaust gas cannot escape, it could then choke your flame.  Or it wouldn't combust until it escaped around the frame.

You could try setting your burner off to one side to create a gap between your frame and your kettle bottom and see if that helps.

--- End quote ---

I think you're perceiving things correctly, Wesbrau.  There really isn't anywhere for exhaust gas to go.  I could probably use my dremel to cut out part of the burner shield (which is welded to the diamond mounting frame).

Wesbrau:
I think cutting holes in the burner shield might not be the answer.  It looks like you already have a sizeable opening in the shield on the corner where the burner assembly comes in.  I think the problem might be that you're trapping the exhaust in the diamond shaped part of the frame, between the burner and the kettle bottom.   

The diamond part of the frame appears to be 2" thick.  Cutting holes in the shield below it would thus be 2" lower than might be needed, because hot exhaust wants to rise up.

You could probably test this theory by setting your pot off center to create a gap between the diamond part of the frame and the kettle.  If that opening serves as a flue for the exhaust, it might tame the runaway flames and result in the burner going back to normal.  If so, I would think that would mean the diamond part of the frame is the part that is in the way.  You may have to cut out the midpoints on the sides of the diamond.

I'm no expert on this subject by any means, so take what I say with a grain (or bag) of salt.  I'm just throwing out ideas.  Definitely get a second or fifth opinion before you do any cutting.

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