Author Topic: Base malt recommendation for Belgian brews  (Read 3158 times)

Offline AmandaK

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Re: Base malt recommendation for Belgian brews
« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2013, 07:09:48 AM »
I've used Castle with great success in my Belgians, but it's my first sack of Belgian Pils, so I don't have much to compare to.
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Base malt recommendation for Belgian brews
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2013, 07:33:26 AM »
I have used both MFB pils and Best pils with very good results.  I prefer Weyermann for Munich type malts though.
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Base malt recommendation for Belgian brews
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2013, 03:42:58 PM »
Denny set me early on with Best Malz pils - I tried it, agreed on its quality and haven't looked back, but I can't always get it locally (I buy by the full 50 lb sack), so Dingeman's has been a close second for pils malt. 
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Offline dannyjed

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Re: Base malt recommendation for Belgian brews
« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2013, 04:50:25 PM »
I have to agree with the others - Best is wonderful.  The last Dubbel I made with it was the best one yet.
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Offline anthony

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Re: Base malt recommendation for Belgian brews
« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2013, 10:15:18 PM »
I like to use MFB pale as my Belgian base malt. At times I think Pils distracts from what you're trying to do in those beers. The few breweries I've toured in Belgium and Germany all seemed to use a mix of pils/pale depending on the brewery. I remember munching on the grain at Ayinger and thinking that their base malt, which they described in typical German fashion as 'lager' malt, seemed much more subdued than typical Best or Weyermann Pils.