Author Topic: Fermenting a Barleywine  (Read 2965 times)

Offline davidgzach

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Fermenting a Barleywine
« on: January 10, 2013, 06:07:12 AM »
I got an O2 kit for Christmas and plan to use it for the first time on my first Barleywine.  Right now my recipe is at 1.102 for a 2.88 gallon batch.  I don't want to make a full 5G of this stuff!  I plan to repitch some WLB037 from a 1.050 Nut Brown Ale.  My questions:
1) How long should I aerate ~3 gallons of 1.102 wort with O2?
2) Should I re-aerate after a couple of days?  How many and for how long?
3) Should I add more slurry after a few days?  If yes, how many days?

Thanks!  Anything else I should be considering, please add!

Dave
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Offline euge

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2013, 06:26:35 AM »
I think a loose ROT could be 1-2 seconds per gallon?  Re-aerating not sure about and maybe not recommended. I pitched an entire additional fresh slurry of 001 my last high gravity ferment (1.106) when the brew got below 1.050 as insurance. It was below 1.010 at the final reading.

Just chugged along and took about 2 weeks at 70-ish temps.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline dbarber

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2013, 06:59:26 AM »
For big beers I oxygenate for 2 minutes for a 5 gal batch.  I have never re-oxygentated but there are plenty of people who do.  For barleywines I rack the wort onto the yeast from a previous low-gravity beer and have never had a problem with the beers attenuating. 

The only other I would add is monitor your fermentation temperature and don't let it get out of the 60s.  When making a beer with this amount of sugar fermentation can really take off.
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Offline Mark G

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2013, 07:04:37 AM »
With pure O2, I would let it run for 60-90 seconds. At such a high gravity, it wouldn't hurt to aerate again after 12-24 hours. As far as repitching slurry, I'd say it's better to just pitch the appropriate amount upfront. mrmalty.com has a calculator for slurry pitching rate.
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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2013, 07:08:46 AM »
The figure I see is 1 minute of aeration at a flow rate of 1 liter O2/minute. The means you need a flow meter of course, but time isn't really a measure of how much O2 goes into the wort.
 
Adding more slurry after a few days is useless if you think about it.  Your yeast has gone through the growth phase at that point. It has reproduced many times over and there are billions of cells in there. Adding a few million more is not going to make a difference. Also, if you thought it did need help, it would have been better to add them at the beginning so they could multiply with the rest of the yeast cells.
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2013, 07:39:02 AM »
I've never had a problem with beer that big attenuating as long as it's pitched on the cake of a smaller beer.  I've gotten great attenuation with yeasts such as Windsor, which is not necessarily a great attenuator.

I've never done additional aeration after fermentation begins.

As far as not making a small batch, I say do the whole 5 gallons.  Bottle it and age it.

I've found with my strong ales that they are always gone sooner than I would like, even though I cracked a the last bottle of a 2006 barleywine on Christmas eve.
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2013, 08:55:48 AM »
Thanks for the replies.  I planned on a monster pitch upfront and actually a little more than what Mr Malty says being it's slurry.  I'll leave it at that and come back if there are any issues!

MTN-Where do I go about getting a flow meter?

Joe-You may have just talked me in to the full 5G batch!  I was just the recipient of 3 free cases of Grolsch bottles so I can afford to tie up 2 of them for a while since I mostly keg.

Dave
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2013, 08:58:24 AM »
Thanks for the replies.  I planned on a monster pitch upfront and actually a little more than what Mr Malty says being it's slurry.  I'll leave it at that and come back if there are any issues!

MTN-Where do I go about getting a flow meter?

Joe-You may have just talked me in to the full 5G batch!  I was just the recipient of 3 free cases of Grolsch bottles so I can afford to tie up 2 of them for a while since I mostly keg.

Dave

yeah, go for the whole 5 gallons.

Offline tom

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2013, 10:52:17 AM »
I usually do 1 minute per 5 gallons of ale, 2 for lagers or big beers.  You can re-oxygenate up to 24 hours later.  I don't have a flow meter.  I just turn it up until the bubbles start coming. 

I wouldn't trust the Grolsch bottles myself.

And do you have a way to control the fermentation temperature?  Lots of yeast with lots of sugar and oxygen make lots of heat.
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2013, 11:20:08 AM »
I usually do 1 minute per 5 gallons of ale, 2 for lagers or big beers.  You can re-oxygenate up to 24 hours later.  I don't have a flow meter.  I just turn it up until the bubbles start coming. 

I wouldn't trust the Grolsch bottles myself.

And do you have a way to control the fermentation temperature?  Lots of yeast with lots of sugar and oxygen make lots of heat.

Why do you not trust Grolsch bottles?
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2013, 11:53:40 AM »
I usually do 1 minute per 5 gallons of ale, 2 for lagers or big beers.  You can re-oxygenate up to 24 hours later.  I don't have a flow meter.  I just turn it up until the bubbles start coming. 

I wouldn't trust the Grolsch bottles myself.

And do you have a way to control the fermentation temperature?  Lots of yeast with lots of sugar and oxygen make lots of heat.

Why do you not trust Grolsch bottles?

I thought about mentioning that myself. The rubber seals can dry out and with enough presure you could lose carbonation past the seals anyway.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2013, 01:43:23 PM »
I usually do 1 minute per 5 gallons of ale, 2 for lagers or big beers.  You can re-oxygenate up to 24 hours later.  I don't have a flow meter.  I just turn it up until the bubbles start coming. 

I wouldn't trust the Grolsch bottles myself.

And do you have a way to control the fermentation temperature?  Lots of yeast with lots of sugar and oxygen make lots of heat.

Why do you not trust Grolsch bottles?

I thought about mentioning that myself. The rubber seals can dry out and with enough presure you could lose carbonation past the seals anyway.

I use them all the time and have some that are quite old.  Replacement seals come in bags of 100 or so and are relatively cheap.  I am a big fan of these bottles, though if bottling off the keg I prefer to use cappable bottles with oxy caps.
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Offline denny

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2013, 02:30:21 PM »
I usually do 1 minute per 5 gallons of ale, 2 for lagers or big beers.  You can re-oxygenate up to 24 hours later.  I don't have a flow meter.  I just turn it up until the bubbles start coming. 

I wouldn't trust the Grolsch bottles myself.

And do you have a way to control the fermentation temperature?  Lots of yeast with lots of sugar and oxygen make lots of heat.

Why do you not trust Grolsch bottles?

I thought about mentioning that myself. The rubber seals can dry out and with enough presure you could lose carbonation past the seals anyway.

So the advice would be "don't trust bad Grolsch bottles", right?  ;)
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2013, 04:07:23 PM »
I usually do 1 minute per 5 gallons of ale, 2 for lagers or big beers.  You can re-oxygenate up to 24 hours later.  I don't have a flow meter.  I just turn it up until the bubbles start coming. 

I wouldn't trust the Grolsch bottles myself.

And do you have a way to control the fermentation temperature?  Lots of yeast with lots of sugar and oxygen make lots of heat.

Why do you not trust Grolsch bottles?

I thought about mentioning that myself. The rubber seals can dry out and with enough presure you could lose carbonation past the seals anyway.

So the advice would be "don't trust bad Grolsch bottles", right?  ;)

I was more thinking that with extended ageing the seal might dry up while the beer is still in there. for shorter storage periods I have no problem at all with the flip tops used to use them all the time before I started just saving commercial empties.

Offline tom

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2013, 04:18:24 PM »
I usually do 1 minute per 5 gallons of ale, 2 for lagers or big beers.  You can re-oxygenate up to 24 hours later.  I don't have a flow meter.  I just turn it up until the bubbles start coming. 

I wouldn't trust the Grolsch bottles myself.

And do you have a way to control the fermentation temperature?  Lots of yeast with lots of sugar and oxygen make lots of heat.

Why do you not trust Grolsch bottles?

I thought about mentioning that myself. The rubber seals can dry out and with enough presure you could lose carbonation past the seals anyway.

So the advice would be "don't trust bad Grolsch bottles", right?  ;)
"don't trust bad (or potentially bad) Grolsch bottle cap seals"
Brew on